Mining Pool Payouts

Mining Pool Payouts explained: PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+

What is a Mining Pool?

Mining Pools

A Mining pools is a hub where a group of Crypto currency miners share their processing power to the network in order to solve the blocks quicker.

The rewards will be split equally based on the amount of shares that they contributed in finding a block.

Pool mining was introduced during early Bitcoin mining days when solo mining became non-viable.

The more powerful your hardware is, the more shares you’ll submit, the more shares you submit, the more you’ll earn.

In order for the pool to pay its miners each pool uses its own payment scheme. Two of the most popular option is PPS and PPLNS.


Mining Pool payouts explained PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+
Mining pool payouts explained: Pay-per-share (PPS)
Pay-Per-Share (PPS)
Pay-per-last-n-shares (PPLNS) MineBest
Pay-Per-Last-N-Shares (PPLNS)
Different mining pool payouts explained: PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+

The first thing a miner has to decide is which pool mining payout is best for their requirements.

PROP (proportional), FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), SMPPS (Shared Maximum Pay Per Share), ESMPPS (Equalized Shared Maximum Pay Per Share), CPPSRB (Capped Pay Per Share with Recent Backpay), PPS (Pay Per Share), PPLNS (Pay Per Last N Share) and lastly PPS+ (Pay Per Share Plus).

Among them PPS and PPLNS are the two types of payment models that are mostly used by mining pools currently. Before we explain both PPS and PPLNS we’ll make a short note on mining pool.

There are numerous payment systems (over 15), but the vast majority of the pools operate on a PPS, FPPS, PPS+ and PPLNS basis.

However, before trying to understand the different settlement models, it is important to come to a consensus on some terms used in crypto mining.

Block Reward: Block reward refers to the new coins issued by the network to miners for each successfully solved block.

Hashing PowerHash rate is the speed at which a computer completes an operation in the cryptocurrency’s code. A higher hashrate increases a miner’s opportunity of finding the next block.

Luck: Luck, in mining, is the probability of success. Imagine that each miner is given a lottery ticket for a certain amount of hashing power they provide. If they are to provide 1 TH/s hashing power when the overall hashing power in the network is 10 TH/s, then they would receive 1 of 10 total lottery tickets. The probability of winning the lottery (in this case finding the block reward) would be 10%.

Transaction Fees: Some networks (like Bitcoin) also have substantial amounts of transaction fees rewarded to miners. These fees are the total fees paid by users of the network to execute transactions.

Pay-Per-Share (PPS)

PPS offers an instant flat payout for each share that is solved. With this payment method, a miner gets a standard payout rate for each share completed. Each share is worth a certain amount of mineable cryptocurrency.

After deducting the mining pool fees, the miners are given a fixed income every day. Therefore, under the PPS mode, the returns are relatively stable. Miners are exposed to risk here. They may not get the transaction fees.

It is ideal for low priced orders for an extended period. This model becomes lucrative during a bearish run of a particular coin.

Pay-Per-Last-N-Shares (PPLNS)

With this payout, profits will be allocated based on the number of shares miners contribute. This kind of allocation method is closely related to the block mined out. If the mining pool excavates multiple blocks in a day, the miners will have a high profit; if the mining pool is not able to mine a block during the whole day, the miner’s profit during the whole day is zero.

Notably, in the short term, the PPLNS model is highly correlated with a pool’s luck. If the luck factor of a particular mining pool decreases in the short term, the miner’s income will also decrease accordingly (the opposite case of the mining pool being lucky in the short term is possible too). However, in the long term, the luck factor tends to average out to the mean.

Hence, this model is ideal for fixing orders on a big pool that has a high chance of finding a block within the order time limit. Or a standard order which will have miners connected for a longer time.

Pay Per Share + (PPS+)

PPS+ is a blend of two modes mentioned above, PPS and PPLNS. The block reward is settled according to the PPS model. And the mining service charge /transaction fee is settled according to the PPLNS mode.

That is to say, in this mode, the miner can additionally obtain the income of part of the transaction fee based on the PPLNS payment method. This was a major drawback in the PPS model.

Full Pay Per Share (FPPS)

With this pool payout, both the block reward and the mining service charge are settled according to the theoretical profit. Calculate a standard transaction fee within a certain period and distribute it to miners according to their hash power contributions in the pool. It increases the miners’ earnings by sharing some of the transaction fees.

With the PPS and FPPS payment methods, you will get paid no matter if the pool finds a block or not. This is the most significant advantage over PPLNS. The risks and rewards are higher with the PPLNS plan.

The decision on which mining plan to choose from needs to be preceded by the decision of choosing the right mining infrastructure.


Difference between PPS vs PPLNS payment models?

PPLNS

PPLNS stands for Pay Per Last (luck) N Shares. This method calculates your payments based on the number of shares you submitted during a shift.

It includes shift system which is time based or by number of shares submitted by the miners on the pool.

Your pool may find blocks consistently or in overtime it may have huge variations in winning a block and that ultimately affects your payments. PPLNS greatly involves luck factor and you’ll notice huge fluctuations in your 24 hour payout.

If you maintain your mining on a single pool then your payouts will remain consistent and it only differs when new miners join or leave the pool.

PPS

Pay Per Share pays you an average of the number of shares that you contributed to the pool in finding blocks.

PPS pays you on solid rate and is more of a direct method which completely eliminates luck factor.

In PPS method regardless of the pools lucky at winning blocks you’re going to get 100% payout at the end of the day. This is because there is a standard payout set for each miners based on their hash power.

It won’t be more than 100% or less than that and with this PPS method you can easily calculate your potential earnings.

On the other hand with PPLNS payment system on average you can either get more than 100% or less than that. It is based on how lucky the pool is at finding blocks.

Should I choose PPS or PPLNS?

This is one of the common questions most miners have initially.

Should I choose Pay Per Share or Pay Per Last N Share pools?

If you are the person who don’t switch pools often then PPLNS is definitely for you as such pools are good at rewarding its loyal miners.

Pay Per Share: No matter what, if you need a fixed payouts at the end of the day to liquidate or for whatsoever reason then your choice would be PPS.

Pay Per Share works well for large mining farms who can calculate and have statistics based on their mining power.

PPS is good for large miners but really bad for pool owners as there is a guaranteed payout for work no matter if the pool hits the block or not.

For this reason and because of pool hoppers (not loyal miners of the pool) most of the mining pools have switched to PPLNS payment model.

Pay Per Last N Shares: If you are the one that is looking to accumulate and hold more coins then PPLNS is recommended.

For each block that your pool finds you’ll get a share based on your hashrate.

Unlike PPS, in PPLNS you’ll get payouts more often and in the long run you’ll be rewarded more with PPLNS than PPS.

However due to huge variance it’s really hard to calculate your mining income.

PPLNS is good for both mid-range miners and pool owners as the payouts is only based on the blocks found.

If your pool is more lucky  then you’ll see payments more often. This is the reason why miners stick to a pool where there is more hash power assuming the pool finds block very often.

You can find more comparison of mining pools payment system here.

How to find out if a pool is PPS or PPLNS?

Cryptocurrency mining can be a lucrative process. However it’s very important that you find out what payment scheme your pool is using before committing your hashing power.

Most of the mining pools has this information listed on FAQ page or at payouts page. If you’re unable to find this information then the only option is to contact the pool support.

Hope the information on this page is helpful for you to decide the right mining pool.


Happy Hashing


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Kudos to @ChessurKot

I 💚 it so much i had to share it !!!

Amazing poster and imagination !!!

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Bitcoin is independent from “crypto”

Bitcoin vs “Crypto

@bithouseco

   The quality of Bitcoin’s monetary policy and the public’s confidence that the policy will be respected in the long-run is all what really matters.

For all of you out there, who believe that Bitcoin falls under the “crypto” umbrella, you could not be further from the truth.

“Crypto” is designated for the affinity scams that launched in Bitcoin’s shadow and attempted to leverage its pedigree and latch on to its narrative to sell useless tokens to unwitting noobs.

The scammers believe they can “beat” Bitcoin by providing a feature set and a “culture” more appealing to the masses and make individuals more likely to pick their favorite “crypto” over the best money humans have ever come in contact with.

As most people, these people couldn’t be more delusional.

The success of Bitcoin doesn’t depend on the “culture” of bitcoiners.

Bitcoin is a protocol that has no way of knowing the “culture” of its users.

If it is successful it will be used by many different people from many worldwide  lands with very different cultures.

A cultural hold on a particular competitive landscape of social media doesn’t really impress no one at the end of the day.

What really matters is the quality of Bitcoin’s monetary policy and the public’s confidence that the policy will be respected in the long-run.

The best way to build confidence in that policy is to make the cost of attempting to change that policy, or falling out of line with the consensus rules of the network as high as possible.

Nothing in “crypto” comes close to Bitcoin in these regards, and that is because the Bitcoin network is slowly but surely integrating itself into the energy sector of the globe.

The execution risks associated with mining Bitcoin have become very high.

If a miner fucks up and falls out of consensus, they are punished materially by missing out on precious block reward payouts.

As the network becomes more integrated with the energy sector, these costs will rise and abiding by the monetary policy put forth by the network of full nodes will be paramount.

It happend in 2017 when the biggest corporate players and miners attempted to hard fork a block space increase that fell out of consensus with the full nodes on the network.

The unwillingness to follow consensus ruined reputations and lost a lot of miners a lot of money over the four years that have followed the hard fork.

This is the certainty for the people, that bitcoin is a suitable monetary good in the digital age.

All of “crypto” pretenters focused on speed, app building, and being less “energy intensive” have completely missed the plot and have relegated themselves to a hedonistic odd sand box filled with degenerate gamblers and low energy thinkers.

Bitcoin has already won because it has won the energy game.

This energy game is what will protect Bitcoin’s monetary policy in the long-run, being strongly incentivized by full nodes to do so.

Very few understand this and very few will ever understand that !!!

Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a decentralized digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: transaction management and money issuance are carried out collectively by the network.

The original Bitcoin software by Satoshi Nakamoto was released under the MIT license. Most client software, derived or “from scratch”, also use open source licensing.

Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain.

The cryptocurrency was invented in 2008 by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto.

The currency began use in 2009 when its implementation was released as open-source software.

Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies, products, and services, but the real-world value of the coins is extremely volatile.

Bitcoin is the first successful implementation of a distributed crypto-currency, described in part in 1998 by Wei Dai on the cypherpunks mailing list. Building upon the notion that money is any object, or any sort of record, accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a given country or socio-economic context, Bitcoin is designed around the idea of using cryptography to control the creation and transfer of money, rather than relying on central authorities.

Bitcoins have all the desirable properties of a money-like good. They are portable, durable, divisible, recognizable, fungible, scarce and difficult to counterfeit.

Bitcoin has been criticized for its use in illegal transactions, the large amount of electricity (and thus carbon footprint) used by mining, 
price volatility, and thefts from exchanges.

Some economists and commentators have characterized it as a speculative bubble at various times.

Bitcoin has also been used as an investment, although several regulatory agencies have issued investor alerts about bitcoin.

Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimated that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.

Why?

Bitcoin is P2P electronic cash that is valuable over legacy systems because of the monetary autonomy it brings to its users.

Bitcoin seeks to address the root problem with conventional currency: all the trust that’s required to make it work — Not that justified trust is a bad thing, but trust makes systems brittle, opaque, and costly to operate.

Trust failures result in systemic collapses, trust curation creates inequality and monopoly lock-in, and naturally arising trust choke-points can be abused to deny access to due process.

Through the use of cryptographic proof, decentralized networks and open source software Bitcoin minimizes and replaces these trust costs.

Bitcoin Transactions are:

  • Permissionless and borderless. The software can be installed by anybody worldwide.
  • Anonymous. Bitcoin does not require any ID to use making it suitable for the unbanked, the privacy-conscious, computers or people in areas with underdeveloped financial infrastructure.
  • Private. When used with care bitcoin can support strong financial privacy.
  • Censorship-resistant. Nobody is able to block or freeze a transaction of any amount.
  • Fast. Transactions can be made almost as fast as data can travel over the Internet.
  • Cheap. Fees can be very very low.Irreversible once settled, like cash. (but consumer protection is still possible.)
  • Online and available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year.

Bitcoin can also be a store of value, some have said it is a “swiss bank account in your pocket”.

Stored Bitcoins:

  • Cannot be printed or debased. Only 21 million bitcoins will ever exist.
  • Have no storage costs. They take up no physical space regardless of amount.
  • Are easy to protect and hide. Can be stored on a phone, computer, encrypted on a paper backup or memorized in your head.
  • No counterparty risk. If you keep the private key of a bitcoin secret and the transaction has enough confirmations, then nobody can take them from you no matter for what reason, no matter how good the excuse, no matter what.
  • Can be under divided possession with Multisignature. For example with a 2-of-3 multisig scheme there would be three private keys, of which any two is enough to spend the money. Those three keys can be spread anywhere, perhaps in multiple locations or known by multiple people. No other asset does this, for example you cannot hold gold coins under multisig.

What is Bitcoin?

A. Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer currency. Peer-to-peer means that no central authority issues new money or tracks transactions. These tasks are managed collectively by the network.

How does Bitcoin work?

A. Bitcoin uses public-key cryptography, peer-to-peer networking, and proof-of-work to process and verify payments. Bitcoins are sent (or signed over) from one address to another with each user potentially having many, many addresses. Each payment transaction is broadcast to the network and included in the blockchain so that the included bitcoins cannot be spent twice. After an hour or two, each transaction is locked in time by the massive amount of processing power that continues to extend the blockchain. Using these techniques, Bitcoin provides a fast and extremely reliable payment network that anyone can use.

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Satoshi Nakamoto bitcoin quotes

The Times 03/Jan/2009
Wikileaks
Lost coins
Transaction fees
Anonymous vs. Pseudonymous
bitcoin’s convenience against credit cards
Scarce asset
Generate new bitcoin address
Not having bitcoin would be the net waste
Inflation vs. Deflation in bitcoin
Potential for a positive feedback loop
…gain a new territory of freedom…
E-currency based on cryptographic proof
Attractive to the libertarian viewpoint
Root problem with conventional currency

$10 Million each coin 🤯😳🤯

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Cypherpunk’s Manifesto

A Cypherpunk’s Manifesto

Eric Hughes

by Eric Hughes

” Privacy is necessary for an open society in the electronic age.

Privacy is not secrecy.

A private matter is something one doesn’t want the whole world to know, but a secret matter is something one doesn’t want anybody to know.

Privacy is the power to selectively reveal oneself to the world.

If two parties have some sort of dealings, then each has a memory of their interaction.

Each party can speak about their own memory of this; how could anyone prevent it?

One could pass laws against it, but the freedom of speech, even more than privacy, is fundamental to an open society; we seek not to restrict any speech at all.

If many parties speak together in the same forum, each can speak to all the others and aggregate together knowledge about individuals and other parties.

The power of electronic communications has enabled such group speech, and it will not go away merely because we might want it to.

Since we desire privacy, we must ensure that each party to a transaction have knowledge only of that which is directly necessary for that transaction.

Since any information can be spoken of, we must ensure that we reveal as little as possible.

In most cases personal identity is not salient. When I purchase a magazine at a store and hand cash to the clerk, there is no need to know who I am.

When I ask my electronic mail provider to send and receive messages, my provider need not know to whom I am speaking or what I am saying or what others are saying to me; my provider only need know how to get the message there and how much I owe them in fees.

When my identity is revealed by the underlying mechanism of the transaction, I have no privacy. I cannot here selectively reveal myself; I must always reveal myself.

Therefore, privacy in an open society requires anonymous transaction systems.

Until now, cash has been the primary such system.

An anonymous transaction system is not a secret transaction system.

An anonymous system empowers individuals to reveal their identity when desired and only when desired; this is the essence of privacy.

Privacy in an open society also requires cryptography.

If I say something, I want it heard only by those for whom I intend it.

If the content of my speech is available to the world, I have no privacy.

To encrypt is to indicate the desire for privacy, and to encrypt with weak cryptography is to indicate not too much desire for privacy.

Furthermore, to reveal one’s identity with assurance when the default is anonymity requires the cryptographic signature.

We cannot expect governments, corporations, or other large, faceless organizations to grant us privacy out of their beneficence.

It is to their advantage to speak of us, and we should expect that they will speak.

To try to prevent their speech is to fight against the realities of information.

Information does not just want to be free, it longs to be free.

Information expands to fill the available storage space.

Information is Rumor’s younger, stronger cousin;

Information is fleeter of foot, has more eyes, knows more, and understands less than Rumor.

We must defend our own privacy if we expect to have any.

We must come together and create systems which allow anonymous transactions to take place.

People have been defending their own privacy for centuries with whispers, darkness, envelopes, closed doors, secret handshakes, and couriers.

The technologies of the past did not allow for strong privacy, but electronic technologies do.

We the Cypherpunks are dedicated to building anonymous systems.

We are defending our privacy with cryptography, with anonymous mail forwarding systems, with digital signatures, and with electronic money.


Cypherpunks write code.


We know that someone has to write software to defend privacy, and since we can’t get privacy unless we all do, we’re going to write it.

We publish our code so that our fellow Cypherpunks may practice and play with it. Our code is free for all to use, worldwide.

We don’t much care if you don’t approve of the software we write.

We know that software can’t be destroyed and that a widely dispersed system can’t be shut down.

Cypherpunks deplore regulations on cryptography, for encryption is fundamentally a private act.

The act of encryption, in fact, removes information from the public realm.

Even laws against cryptography reach only so far as a nation’s border and the arm of its violence.

Cryptography will ineluctably spread over the whole globe, and with it the anonymous transactions systems that it makes possible.

For privacy to be widespread it must be part of a social contract.

People must come and together deploy these systems for the common good. Privacy only extends so far as the cooperation of one’s fellows in society.

We the Cypherpunks seek your questions and your concerns and hope we may engage you so that we do not deceive ourselves.

We will not, however, be moved out of our course because some may disagree with our goals.

The Cypherpunks are actively engaged in making the networks safer for privacy. Let us proceed together apace.

Onward.

Eric Hughes

 <hughes@soda.berkeley.edu>

9 March 1993


☆ Long Live the CypherPunks ☆


The world is in debt for your bright minds, even if it doesn’t know…

It’s minds like yours that always have changed the face of the earth for a better brighter future !

KUDOS TO YOU ALL !!!




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BitHouse LLC

Featured

Strenght in Numbers

BitHouse LLC is a client – focused and result driven CryptoCurrency Consulting and Mining Company that provides broad – based services at an affordable fee to our clients .

We will ensure that we work hard to meet and surpass our Clients’ expectations whenever they hire our services for Consulting or mine bitcoin.

At BitHouse LLC, our Client’s best interest always come first and foremost, and everything we do is guided by our high values and professional ethics.


Services

Cryptocurrency Consulting

General cryptocurrency advice, reviews and due diligence on tokens, blockchain projects, general investment advice and trading strategy.

Security and putting processes in place to backup your crypto.

Cryptocurrency Mining & Staking

Setup and advice on Cryptocurrency mining rigs. Mining does not just include Bitcoin, there are numerous other options to mine, including other tokens, rigs that provide processing power and storage.

Masternodes

Nodes are a great way to generate cryptocurrency, similar to mining just without the expensive hardware.

Setting up and running a node is not straight forward, we can help.

Proof of Stake / Staking Wallets

 Just like mining, storing your cryptocurrency in a wallet that is connected to the blockchain can generate you more crypto of that same token.

If you own POS coins and aren’t staking you are missing out on ROI.


Bitcoin – People’s Money

“Better a diamond with a flaw than a pebble without.”

Confucius

Diamond with a flaw

“Try not to become a man of success. Rather become a man of value.”

Albert Einstein

Man of Value

“If you don’t know what you want, you’ll never find it.

If you don’t know what you deserve, you’ll always settle for less.

You will wander aimlessly, uncomfortably numb in your comfort zone, wondering how life has ended up here.

Life starts now, live, love, laugh and let your light shine!”

Rob Liano

Let your light shine

“A person’s worth is measured by the worth of what he values.”

Marcus Aurelius, “Meditations”

Values

“Mathematics expresses values that reflect the cosmos, including orderliness, balance, harmony, logic, and abstract beauty.”

Deepak Chopra

Mathematics

“Every job from the heart is, ultimately, of equal value.

The nurse injects the syringe; the writer slides the pen; the farmer plows the dirt; the comedian draws the laughter.

Monetary income is the perfect deceiver of a man’s true worth.”

Criss Jami, “Killosophy”

Job from the Heart

“A person that does not value your time will not value your advice.”

Orrin Woodward

Value your time

“Once you embrace your value, talents and strengths, it neutralizes when others think less of you.”

Rob Liano

Embrace your Values

“Bad times have a scientific value. These are occasions a good learner would not miss.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Bad times

“I say no wealth is worth my life.”

Homer, “The Iliad”

Life

“But what’s worth more than gold?

Practically everything.

You, for example.

Gold is heavy.

Your weight in gold is not very much gold at all.

Aren’t you worth more than that?”

Terry Pratchett, “Making Money” 

You are worth more than gold

“Knowledge is like money: To be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.”

Louis L’Amour, “Education of a Wandering Man”

Knowledge

“Ô, Sunlight! The most precious gold to be found on Earth.”

Roman Payne

Sunlight

“Knowledge is like money: To be of value it must circulate, and in circulating it can increase in quantity and, hopefully, in value.”

Louis L’Amour, “Education of a Wandering Man”

Knowledge

“If life — the craving for which is the very essence of our being — were possessed of any positive intrinsic value, there would be no such thing as boredom at all: mere existence would satisfy us in itself, and we should want for nothing.”

Arthur Schopenhauer, “The Vanity of Existence”

Existence

“Our sole purpose on this earth is to add value to others.

It doesn’t make sense to just exist in people’s lives or to be a drain on them, does it?”

Rob Liano

Sole purpose

“Value judgments are destructive to our proper business, which is curiosity and awareness.”

John Cage

Curiosity & Awareness

“We set no special value on the possession of a virtue until we percieve that it is entirely lacking in our adversary.”

Friedrich Nietzsche, “Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits”

Virtue

“Maybe you had to come close to losing something before you could remember its value.

Maybe we enjoy the last minute struggle as it slips through our hands.”

Suraj Sani

Struggle

“Always remember that the minority dictates the prices, and the majority governs the value.”

Naved Abdali

Minority vs. Majority

“It is impossible to say whether an asset class valuation is cheap or expensive in isolation.

The valuation of an asset is relative to the valuations of all other assets.”

Naved Abdali

Valuation of an Asset

“Market quotes change every second, but business evolves steadily.

You have ample time to evaluate a business to buy or not to buy.

There is no rush.”

Naved Abdali

Evaluate

“The number one reason people lose money in investing is because they buy assets without giving any thought whatsoever to the fair value.”

Naved Abdali

Fair Value

“If investors do not know or never attempt to know the fair value, they can pay any price.

More often, the price they pay is far greater than the actual value.”

Naved Abdali

Actual Value

“Watching every tick up and every tick down is just wasting your valuable time.

Do yourself a favor, and pick up a book or two about investing each month.”

Naved Abdali

Pick up a book

“An ounce of gold will always be an ounce of gold regardless of the length of possession.

The short-term value will go up or down, but gold prices will follow the general inflation rate in the long run.”

Naved Abdali

General Inflation Rate

“A Collectible’s value is primarily based on the emotions and the perception of potential buyers.”

Naved Abdali

Emotions & Perception


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