“THE FIAT STANDARD”




I am happy to share with you this chapter from my forthcoming book, The Fiat Standard, which will be out in November in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats.

Chapter 1: Introduction

On August 6, 1915, His Majesty’s Government issued this appeal:

“In view of the importance of strengthening the gold reserves of the country for exchange purposes, the Treasury has instructed the Post Office and all public departments charged with the duty of making cash payments to use notes instead of gold coins whenever possible.

The public generally are earnestly requested, in the national interest, to cooperate with the Treasury in this policy by

(1) paying in gold to the Post Office and to the Banks;

(2) asking for payment of cheques in notes rather than in gold;

(3) using notes rather than gold for payment of wages and cash disbursements generally”.

August 6th, 1915 – His Majesty’s Government

With this obscure and largely forgotten announcement, the Bank of England effectively began the global monetary system’s move away from a gold standard, in which all government and bank obligations were redeemable in physical gold.

At the time, gold coins and bars were still widely used worldwide, but they were of limited use for international trade, which necessitated resorting to the clearance mechanisms of international banks. 

Chief among all banks at the time, the Bank of England’s network spanned the globe, and its pound sterling had, for centuries, acquired the reputation of being as good as gold. 

Instead of the predictable and reliable stability naturally provided by gold, the new global monetary standard was built around government rules, hence its name. The Latin word fiat means ‘let it be done’ and, in English, has been adopted to mean a formal decree, authorization, or rule.

It is an apt term for the current monetary standard, as what distinguishes it most is that it substitutes government dictates for the judgment of the market.

Value on fiat’s base layer is not based on a freely traded physical commodity, but is instead dictated by authority, which can control its issuance, supply, clearance, and settlement, and even confiscate it at any time it sees fit.

With the move to fiat, peaceful exchange on the market no longer determined the value and choice of money. Instead, it was the victors of world wars and the gyrations of international geopolitics that would dictate the choice and value of the medium that constitutes one half of every market transaction.

While the 1915 Bank of England announcement, and others like it at the time, were assumed to be temporary emergency measures necessary to fight the Great War, today, more than a century later, the Bank of England is yet to resume the promised redemption of its notes in gold.

Temporary arrangements restricting note convertibility into gold have turned into the permanent financial infrastructure of the fiat system that took off over the next century.

Never again would the world’s predominant monetary systems be based on currencies fully redeemable in gold.

The above decree might be considered the equivalent of Satoshi Nakamoto’s email to the cryptography mailing list announcing Bitcoin, but unlike Nakamoto, His Majesty’s Government provided no software, white paper, nor any kind of technical specification as to how such a monetary system could be made practical and workable. Unlike the cold precision of Satoshi’s impersonal and dispassionate tone, His Majesty’s Government relied on appeal to authority, and emotional manipulation of its subjects’ sense of patriotism.

Whereas Satoshi was able to launch the Bitcoin network in operational form a few months after its initial announcement, it took two world wars, dozens of monetary conferences, multiple financial crises, and three generations of governments, bankers, and economists struggling to ultimately bring about a fully operable implementation of the fiat standard in 1971.

Fifty years after taking its final form, and one century after its genesis, an assessment of the fiat system is now both possible and necessary. Its longevity makes it unreasonable to keep dismissing the fiat system as an irredeemable fraud on the brink of collapse, as many of its detractors have done for decades. Many people at the end of their life today have never used anything but fiat money, and neither did their long-deceased parents. This cannot be written off as an unexplained fluke, and economists should be able to explain how this system functions and survives, despite its many obvious flaws.

There are, after all, plenty of markets around the world that are massively distorted by government interventions, but they nonetheless continue to survive. It is no endorsement of these interventions to attempt to explain how they persist.

It is also not appropriate to judge fiat systems based on the marketing material of their promoters and beneficiaries in government-financed academia and the popular press.

While the global fiat system so far avoided the complete collapse its detractors would predict, that cannot vindicate its promoters’ advertising of it as a free-lunch-maker with no opportunity cost or consequence. More than fifty episodes of hyperinflation have taken place around the world using fiat monetary systems in the past century. Moreover, the global fiat system avoiding catastrophic collapse is hardly enough to make the case for it as a positive technological, economic, and social development. 

Between the relentless propaganda of its enthusiasts and the rabid venom of its detractors, this book attempts to offer something new: an exploration of the fiat monetary system as a technology, from an engineering and functional perspective, outlining its purposes and common failure modes, and deriving the wider economic, political, and social implications of its use. I believe that adopting this approach to writing

The Bitcoin Standard contributed to making it the best-selling book on bitcoin to date, helping hundreds of thousands of readers across more than 20 languages understand the significance and implications of bitcoin. Rather than focus on the details of how bitcoin operates, I chose to focus on why it operates the way it does, and what the implications are. 

If you have read the Bitcoin Standard and enjoyed my exploration of bitcoin, I hope you will enjoy this exploration of the operation of fiat.

Perhaps counter-intuitively, I believe that by first understanding the operation of bitcoin, you can then better understand the equivalent operations in fiat.

It is easier to explain an abacus to a computer user than it is to explain a computer to an abacus user.

A more advanced technology performs its functions more productively and efficiently, allowing a clear exposition of the mechanisms of the simpler technology, and exposing its weaknesses.

For the reader who has become familiar with the operation of bitcoin, a good way to understand the operation of fiat is by drawing analogy to the operation of bitcoin using concepts like mining, nodes, balances, and proof of work.

My aim is to explain the operation and engineering structure of the fiat monetary system and how it operates, in reality, away from the naive romanticism of governments and banks who have benefited from this system for a century.

The first seven chapters of The Bitcoin Standard explained the history and function of money, and its importance to the economic order. With that foundation laid, the final three chapters introduced bitcoin, explained its operation, and elaborated on how its operation relates to the economic questions discussed in the earlier chapters.

My motivation as an author was to allow readers to understand how bitcoin operates and its monetary significance without requiring them to have a previous background in economics or digital currencies.

Had Bitcoin not been invented, the first seven chapters of The Bitcoin Standard could have served as an introduction to explaining the operation of the fiat monetary system.

This book picks up where Chapter 7 of “The Bitcoin Standard” left off. The first chapters of this book are modeled on the last three chapters of the Bitcoin Standard, except applied to fiat money. 

How does the fiat system actually function, in an operational sense? The success of bitcoin in operating as a bare-bones and standalone free market monetary system helps elucidate the properties and functions necessary to make a monetary system function.

Bitcoin was designed by a software engineer who boiled a monetary system down to its essentials. These choices were then validated by a free market of millions of people around the world who continue to use this system, and currently entrust it to hold more than $300 billion of their wealth.

The fiat monetary system, by contrast, has never been put on a free market for its users to pass the only judgment that matters on it. The all-too-frequent systemic collapses of the fiat monetary system are arguably the true market judgment emerging after suppression by governments.

With bitcoin showing us how an advanced monetary system can function entirely independently of government control, we can see clearly the properties required for a monetary system to operate on the free market, and in the process, better understand fiat’s modes of operation, and all-too-frequent modes of failure.

While fiat systems have not won acceptance on the free market, and though their failings and limitations are many, there is no denying the fact that many fiat systems have worked for large parts of the last century, and facilitated an unfathomably large number of transactions and trades all around the world. Its continued operation makes understanding it useful, particularly as we still live in a world that runs on fiat. Just because you may be done with fiat does not mean that fiat is done with you!

Understanding how the fiat standard works, and how it frequently fails, is essential knowledge for being able to navigate it.


This is a preview chapter from my forthcoming book, The Fiat Standard, which will be out in November in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats.

To begin, it’s important to understand that the fiat system was not a carefully, consciously, or deliberately designed financial operating system like bitcoin; rather, it evolved through a complex process of compromise between political constraints and expedience.

The next chapter illustrates this by examining newly-released historical documents on just how the fiat standard was born, and how it replaced the gold standard, beginning in England in the early twentieth century, completing the transition in 1971 across the Atlantic.

This is not a history book, however, and it will not attempt a full historical account of the development of the fiat standard over the past century, in the same way the Bitcoin Standard did not delve too deeply into the study of the historical development of the bitcoin software protocol. The focus of the first part of the book will be on the operation and function of the fiat monetary system, by making analogy to the operation of the bitcoin network, in what might be called a comparative study of the economics of different monetary engineering systems. 

Chapter 3 examines the underlying technology behind the fiat standard. Contrary to what the name suggests, modern fiat money is not conjured out of thin air through government fiat.

Government does not just print currency and hand it out to a society that accepts it as money. Modern fiat money is far more sophisticated and convoluted in its operation. The fundamental engineering feature of the fiat system is that it treats future promises of money as if they were as good as present money because the government guarantees these promises.

While such an arrangement would not survive in the free market, the coercion of the government can maintain it for a very long time. Government can meet any present financial obligations by diverting them onto future taxpayers or onto current fiat holders through taxes or inflation; and, further, through legal tender laws, the government can prevent any alternatives to its money from gaining traction.

By leveraging their monopoly on the legal use of violence to meet present financial obligations from potential future income, government fiat makes debt into money, forces its acceptance across society, and prevents it from collapsing.

Chapter 4 examines how the fiat network’s native tokens come into existence, using fiat’s antiquated and haphazard version of mining.

As fiat money is credit, credit creation in a fiat currency results in the creation of new money, which means that lending is the fiat version of mining.

Fiat miners are the financial institutions capable of generating fiat-based debt with guarantees from the government and/or central banks.

Unlike with bitcoin’s difficulty adjustment, fiat has no mechanisms for controlling issuance. Credit money, instead, causes constant cycles of expansion and contraction in the money supply with eventual devastating consequences, as this chapter examines.

Chapter 5 explains the topography of the fiat network, which is centered around its only full node, the US Federal Reserve.

The Fed is the only institution that can validate or refuse any transaction on any layer of the network.

Another 200 or so central bank nodes are spread around the world, and these have geographic monopolies on financial and monetary services, where they regulate and manage tens of thousands of commercial bank nodes worldwide.

Unlike with bitcoin, the incentive for running a fiat node is enormous.

Chapter 6 then analyzes balances on the fiat network, and how fiat has the unique feature where many, if not most, users, have negative account balances.

The enormous incentive to mine fiat by issuing debt means individuals, corporations, and governments all face a strong incentive to get into debt.

The monetization and universalization of debt is also a war on savings, and one which governments have persecuted stealthily and mostly quite successfully against their citizens over the last century.

Based on this analysis, Chapter 7 concludes the first section of the book by discussing the uses of fiat, and the problems it solves.

The two obvious uses of fiat are that it allows for the government to easily finance itself, and that it allows banks to engage in maturity-mismatching and fractional reserve banking while largely protected from the inevitable downside.

But the third use of fiat is the one that has been the most important to its survival: salability across space.

From the outset, I will make a confession to the reader. Attempting to think of the fiat monetary system in engineering terms and trying to understand the problem it solves have resulted in giving me an appreciation of its usefulness, and a less harsh assessment of the motives and circumstances which led to its emergence.

Understanding the problem this fiat system solves makes the move from the gold standard to the fiat standard appear less outlandish and insane than it had appeared to me while writing The Bitcoin Standard, as a hard money believer who could see nothing good or reasonable about the move to an easier money. 

Seeing that the analytical framework of “The Bitcoin Standard” was built around the concept of salability across time, and the ability of money to hold its value into the future, and the implications of that to society, the fiat standard initially appears as a deliberate nefarious conspiracy to destroy human civilization.

But writing this book, and thinking very hard about the operational reality of fiat, has brought into sharper focus the property of salability across space, and in the process, made the rationale for the emergence of the fiat standard clearer, and more comprehensible.

For all its many failings, there is no escaping the conclusion that the fiat standard was indeed a solution to a real and debilitating problem with the gold standard, namely its low spatial salability.

More than any conspiracy, the limited spatial salability of gold as global trade advanced allowed the survival of the fiat standard for so long, making its low temporal salability a tolerable problem, and allowing governments worldwide tremendous leeway to bribe their current citizens at the expense of their future citizens by creating the easy fiat tokens that operate their payment networks.

As we take stock of a whole century of operation for this monetary system, a sober and nuanced assessment can appreciate the significance of this solution for facilitating global trade, while also understanding how it has allowed the inflation that benefited governments at the expense of their future citizens.

Fiat may have been a huge step backward in terms of its salability across time, but it was a substantial leap forward in terms of salability across space.

Having laid out the mechanics for the operation of fiat in the first section, the book’s second section, Fiat Life, examines the economic, societal, and political implications of a society utilizing such a form of money with uncertain and usually poor inter-temporal salability.

This section focuses on analyzing the implications of two economic causal mechanisms of fiat money: the utilization of debt as money; and the ability of the government to grant this debt at essentially no cost.

Fiat increasingly divorces economic reward from economic productivity, and instead bases it on political allegiance. This attempted suspension of the concept of opportunity cost makes fiat a revolt against the natural order of the world, in which humans, and all other animals, have to struggle against scarcity every day of their lives.

Nature provides humans with reward only when their toil is successful, and similarly, markets only reward humans when they are able to produce something that others value subjectively.

After a century of economic value being assigned at the point of a gun, these indisputable realities of life are unknown to, or denied by, huge swathes of the world’s population who look to their government for their salvation and sustenance.

The suspension of the normal workings of scarcity through government dictat has enormous implications on individual time preference and decision-making, with important consequences to many facets of life.

In the second section of the book, we explore the impacts of fiat on family, food, education, science, health, fuels, and security. 

While the title of the book refers to fiat, this really is a book about bitcoin, and the first two sections build up the analytical foundation for the main course that is the third part of the book, examining the all-too-important question with which “The Bitcoin Standard” leaves the reader: what will the relationship between fiat and bitcoin be in the coming years?

Chapter 16 examines the specific properties of bitcoin that make it a potential solution to the problems of fiat.

While “The Bitcoin Standard” focused on bitcoin’s intertemporal salability, The Fiat Standard examines how bitcoin’s salability across space is the mechanism that makes it a more serious threat to fiat than gold and other physical monies with low spatial salability.

Bitcoin’s high salability across space allows us to monetize a hard asset itself, and not credit claims on it, as was the case with the gold standard.

At its most basic, bitcoin increases humanity’s capacity for long-distance international settlement by around 500,000 transactions a day, and completes that settlement in a few hours.

This is an enormous upgrade over gold’s capacity, and makes international settlement a far more open market, much harder to monopolize.

This also helps us understand bitcoin’s value proposition as not just in being harder than gold, but also in traveling much faster.

Bitcoin effectively combines gold’s salability across time with fiat’s salability across space in one apolitical immutable open source package.

By being a hard asset, bitcoin is also debt-free, and its creation does not incentivize the creation of debt. By offering finality of settlement every ten minutes, bitcoin also makes the use of credit money very difficult. At each block interval, the ownership of all bitcoins is confirmed by tens of thousands of nodes all over the world. There can be no authority whose fiat can make good a broken promise to deliver a bitcoin by a certain block time.

Financial institutions that engage in fractional reserve banking in a bitcoin economy will always be under the threat of a bank run as long as no institution exists that can conjure present bitcoin at significantly lower than the market rate, as governments are able to do with their fiat. 

Chapter 17 discusses bitcoin scaling in detail, and argues it will likely happen through second layer solutions which will be optimized for speed, high volume, and low cost, but involve trade-offs in security and liquidity.

Chapter 18 builds on this analysis to discuss what banking would look like under a Bitcoin Standard, while chapter 19 discusses how savings would work under such a system.

Chapter 20 studies bitcoin’s energy consumption, how it is related to bitcoin’s security, and how it can positively impact the market for energy worldwide.

With this foundation, the book can tackle the question: how can bitcoin rise in the world of fiat, and what are the implications for these two monetary standards coexisting?

Chapter 21 analyzes different scenarios in which bitcoin continues to grow and thrive, while Chapter 22 examines scenarios where bitcoin fails.

I hope you enjoyed this preview chapter from my forthcoming book, The Fiat Standard, which will be out in November in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats.



All the Credit goes to Saifedean Ammous


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Smart Contracts Networks

Top upcoming Smart Contract Networks


Comparing the Top Upcoming Smart Contract Networks

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Bitcoin/Crypto Wallet types

Choose the wallet that better suits You

You may choose a wallet based on what best suits your needs. we will explore various
types of wallets and clients:

• Web
• Desktop
• Mobile
• Hardware
• Paper (Not Secure Anymore)

Wallets and clients can be chosen based on a number of criteria:

  • How much bitcoin is being used / stored
  • IT proficiency (beginner vs. expert)
  • Type of device
  • Occasional use vs. everyday use
  • Security and privacy concerns
  • Cryptocurrencies being used
  • Type and complexity of transactions

Find the wallet that’s right for you:


https://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wallet

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Bitcoin – The People’s Money

Power to the People
Not by Force but by Free Will
The Choice is always Yours
Arise…
Choose Wisely…
People do not understand the Monetary System
Privacy is not Secrecy.
Veritas
Bitcoin cannot be ShutDown
Power of the long tail
CypherPunks Write Code
bitcoin Genesis Block

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Btc-Usd Monthly Returns


Btc-Usd Monthly Returns 2011-2021

Asset Class Total Return over last 10 Years

Numbers talk louder and more truthful than words could ever do !!!

Simple plain numbers that have the answer everyone is looking for 🙂😉

That’s what I love about mathematics, it’s an undeniable Truth !!!

Read and pick your own conclusion folks !!!

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Mining Pool Payouts

Mining Pool Payouts explained: PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+

What is a Mining Pool?

Mining Pools

A Mining pools is a hub where a group of Crypto currency miners share their processing power to the network in order to solve the blocks quicker.

The rewards will be split equally based on the amount of shares that they contributed in finding a block.

Pool mining was introduced during early Bitcoin mining days when solo mining became non-viable.

The more powerful your hardware is, the more shares you’ll submit, the more shares you submit, the more you’ll earn.

In order for the pool to pay its miners each pool uses its own payment scheme. Two of the most popular option is PPS and PPLNS.


Mining Pool payouts explained PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+
Mining pool payouts explained: Pay-per-share (PPS)
Pay-Per-Share (PPS)
Pay-per-last-n-shares (PPLNS) MineBest
Pay-Per-Last-N-Shares (PPLNS)
Different mining pool payouts explained: PPS vs. FPPS vs. PPLNS vs. PPS+

The first thing a miner has to decide is which pool mining payout is best for their requirements.

PROP (proportional), FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), SMPPS (Shared Maximum Pay Per Share), ESMPPS (Equalized Shared Maximum Pay Per Share), CPPSRB (Capped Pay Per Share with Recent Backpay), PPS (Pay Per Share), PPLNS (Pay Per Last N Share) and lastly PPS+ (Pay Per Share Plus).

Among them PPS and PPLNS are the two types of payment models that are mostly used by mining pools currently. Before we explain both PPS and PPLNS we’ll make a short note on mining pool.

There are numerous payment systems (over 15), but the vast majority of the pools operate on a PPS, FPPS, PPS+ and PPLNS basis.

However, before trying to understand the different settlement models, it is important to come to a consensus on some terms used in crypto mining.

Block Reward: Block reward refers to the new coins issued by the network to miners for each successfully solved block.

Hashing PowerHash rate is the speed at which a computer completes an operation in the cryptocurrency’s code. A higher hashrate increases a miner’s opportunity of finding the next block.

Luck: Luck, in mining, is the probability of success. Imagine that each miner is given a lottery ticket for a certain amount of hashing power they provide. If they are to provide 1 TH/s hashing power when the overall hashing power in the network is 10 TH/s, then they would receive 1 of 10 total lottery tickets. The probability of winning the lottery (in this case finding the block reward) would be 10%.

Transaction Fees: Some networks (like Bitcoin) also have substantial amounts of transaction fees rewarded to miners. These fees are the total fees paid by users of the network to execute transactions.

Pay-Per-Share (PPS)

PPS offers an instant flat payout for each share that is solved. With this payment method, a miner gets a standard payout rate for each share completed. Each share is worth a certain amount of mineable cryptocurrency.

After deducting the mining pool fees, the miners are given a fixed income every day. Therefore, under the PPS mode, the returns are relatively stable. Miners are exposed to risk here. They may not get the transaction fees.

It is ideal for low priced orders for an extended period. This model becomes lucrative during a bearish run of a particular coin.

Pay-Per-Last-N-Shares (PPLNS)

With this payout, profits will be allocated based on the number of shares miners contribute. This kind of allocation method is closely related to the block mined out. If the mining pool excavates multiple blocks in a day, the miners will have a high profit; if the mining pool is not able to mine a block during the whole day, the miner’s profit during the whole day is zero.

Notably, in the short term, the PPLNS model is highly correlated with a pool’s luck. If the luck factor of a particular mining pool decreases in the short term, the miner’s income will also decrease accordingly (the opposite case of the mining pool being lucky in the short term is possible too). However, in the long term, the luck factor tends to average out to the mean.

Hence, this model is ideal for fixing orders on a big pool that has a high chance of finding a block within the order time limit. Or a standard order which will have miners connected for a longer time.

Pay Per Share + (PPS+)

PPS+ is a blend of two modes mentioned above, PPS and PPLNS. The block reward is settled according to the PPS model. And the mining service charge /transaction fee is settled according to the PPLNS mode.

That is to say, in this mode, the miner can additionally obtain the income of part of the transaction fee based on the PPLNS payment method. This was a major drawback in the PPS model.

Full Pay Per Share (FPPS)

With this pool payout, both the block reward and the mining service charge are settled according to the theoretical profit. Calculate a standard transaction fee within a certain period and distribute it to miners according to their hash power contributions in the pool. It increases the miners’ earnings by sharing some of the transaction fees.

With the PPS and FPPS payment methods, you will get paid no matter if the pool finds a block or not. This is the most significant advantage over PPLNS. The risks and rewards are higher with the PPLNS plan.

The decision on which mining plan to choose from needs to be preceded by the decision of choosing the right mining infrastructure.


Difference between PPS vs PPLNS payment models?

PPLNS

PPLNS stands for Pay Per Last (luck) N Shares. This method calculates your payments based on the number of shares you submitted during a shift.

It includes shift system which is time based or by number of shares submitted by the miners on the pool.

Your pool may find blocks consistently or in overtime it may have huge variations in winning a block and that ultimately affects your payments. PPLNS greatly involves luck factor and you’ll notice huge fluctuations in your 24 hour payout.

If you maintain your mining on a single pool then your payouts will remain consistent and it only differs when new miners join or leave the pool.

PPS

Pay Per Share pays you an average of the number of shares that you contributed to the pool in finding blocks.

PPS pays you on solid rate and is more of a direct method which completely eliminates luck factor.

In PPS method regardless of the pools lucky at winning blocks you’re going to get 100% payout at the end of the day. This is because there is a standard payout set for each miners based on their hash power.

It won’t be more than 100% or less than that and with this PPS method you can easily calculate your potential earnings.

On the other hand with PPLNS payment system on average you can either get more than 100% or less than that. It is based on how lucky the pool is at finding blocks.

Should I choose PPS or PPLNS?

This is one of the common questions most miners have initially.

Should I choose Pay Per Share or Pay Per Last N Share pools?

If you are the person who don’t switch pools often then PPLNS is definitely for you as such pools are good at rewarding its loyal miners.

Pay Per Share: No matter what, if you need a fixed payouts at the end of the day to liquidate or for whatsoever reason then your choice would be PPS.

Pay Per Share works well for large mining farms who can calculate and have statistics based on their mining power.

PPS is good for large miners but really bad for pool owners as there is a guaranteed payout for work no matter if the pool hits the block or not.

For this reason and because of pool hoppers (not loyal miners of the pool) most of the mining pools have switched to PPLNS payment model.

Pay Per Last N Shares: If you are the one that is looking to accumulate and hold more coins then PPLNS is recommended.

For each block that your pool finds you’ll get a share based on your hashrate.

Unlike PPS, in PPLNS you’ll get payouts more often and in the long run you’ll be rewarded more with PPLNS than PPS.

However due to huge variance it’s really hard to calculate your mining income.

PPLNS is good for both mid-range miners and pool owners as the payouts is only based on the blocks found.

If your pool is more lucky  then you’ll see payments more often. This is the reason why miners stick to a pool where there is more hash power assuming the pool finds block very often.

You can find more comparison of mining pools payment system here.

How to find out if a pool is PPS or PPLNS?

Cryptocurrency mining can be a lucrative process. However it’s very important that you find out what payment scheme your pool is using before committing your hashing power.

Most of the mining pools has this information listed on FAQ page or at payouts page. If you’re unable to find this information then the only option is to contact the pool support.

Hope the information on this page is helpful for you to decide the right mining pool.


Happy Hashing


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DEX Aggregators 2022

Top DEX Aggregators

Decentralized exchange (DEX) aggregators, also known as liquidity aggregators, compile the exchange rates of numerous DEX platforms and show you a list of platforms offering the best value for your crypto trades.

Moreover, you can access a deeper pool of liquidity by trading on multiple DEXs using a single trading dashboard. Think of them as the search engines of the DeFi landscape, scouring DEXs for the best deals so that you can swap your crypto assets with the lowest fees.

1Inch

Although it is a DEX in its own right, 1Inch’s main USP is its position as a top DEX aggregator across multiple blockchains. The network supports trades across major ecosystems like Ethereum and Binance and smaller networks like Polygon, Arbitrum, and Optimism.

As an aggregator, 1Inch gives you access to over 120 liquidity sources, with 68 on Ethereum, 39 on Binance, and 24 on Polygon. With daily trading volumes averaging close to $300 million from 300,000+ active users, it is one of the most active DEX aggregators in 2021.

The native token of the 1Inch DEX is also called 1INCH. It functions as both a utility token and a governance token for the protocol. 1INCH is a multi-chain token available on the Ethereum and Binance Smart Chain.

1Inch is one of the best DEX aggregators for crypto rookies, with detailed documentation and a well-developed Help Center filled with starter guides, FAQs, and more.



Slingshot

Slingshot grew out of DEX.AG, a DEX aggregator platform created in late 2018 as part of a hackathon event. At its launch, it supported seven major DEX, including Uniswap, Kyber, and DDEX.

After million-dollar funding rounds, DEX.AG was rebranded as Slingshot in November 2020. Slingshot works on Ethereum-based protocols – Polygon (formerly MATIC) and Arbitrum One. Across the two, you get access to over 326 exchanges/liquidity sources.

Slingshot is a very popular choice among experienced cryptocurrency traders due to its relative simplicity and advanced functionality. The average daily volumes touching over half a billion dollars is a testament to the platform’s popularity.

However, due to a threadbare interface and lack of easily accessible website FAQs, guides, and documentation, Slingshot is not a very beginner-friendly DEX platform.



Totle Swap

Totle is a DEX aggregator that also dips into synthetic asset providers, allowing traders to engage with tokenized assets of many shapes and sizes. Unfortunately, the platform seems to be dormant, with no updates since mid-2021 and a lack of stats on any major crypto platform.


ParaSwap

ParaSwap is a versatile DEX aggregator supporting Ethereum, Binance, Polygon, and Avalanche blockchains. In addition, it has a native token for liquidity and governance purposes called the PSP.

While it is one of the more feature-packed and beginner-friendly DEX aggregators, ParaSwap is still in the growth phase. In 2021, the platform reported 1.4 million total users over time, with daily transaction volumes peaking around $150 million.

ParaSwap allows you access to swap and payment options across 75 DEX platforms, focusing on better market rates and cheaper gas fees. In addition, decentralized applications (dApps) can also integrate with ParaSwap to better streamline token swaps.


Matcha

Like 1Inch and Slingshot, Matcha is both a DEX aggregator and a decentralized exchange in itself. Powered by 0x Labs, the platform focuses on transparency, lower fees, smart order routing, and easier access.

Thanks to a recent partnership with MoonPay, Matcha can now accept payments in fiat currencies, a first for DEX platforms. This could be very useful for newcomers – you can directly purchase cryptos using regular currency on Matcha and start trading immediately.

Matcha provides access to over 50 liquidity sources and DEX platforms across three blockchain systems – Ethereum, Binance, and Polygon. Despite being one of the younger platforms on this list (launched in 2020), Matcha boasts over 2.5k daily traders. Its daily volumes are close to $150 million.


Uniswap V3

Uniswap is a DEX platform based on the Automated Marker Maker (AMM) model. After its launch in November 2018, the DEX has seen a meteoric rise among crypto circles. As of Q4 2021, it routinely tops the charts of DEX platforms with the largest daily volumes with $5.5 billion.

The platform is currently in its third iteration – Uniswap V3. Based on the Ethereum Blockchain, Uniswap gives you access to over 50 liquidity pools, with 285 cryptocurrencies across more than 350 markets. The USDC-ETH pair alone accounts for over $1.8 billion worth of trades each day.

While not a DEX aggregator per se, Uniswap is still a great option to consider due to its sheer size and reach. Most of the other aggregators on this list have Uniswap as a major partner and source of trading options.


PancakeSwap

PancakeSwap launched in 2020 to work like Uniswap, but on the Binance Smart Chain instead of Ethereum. Like Uniswap, PancakeSwap is a DEX platform with an AMM operating model, with an additional focus on yield farming based on the native CAKE token.

Regardless of the sweet and syrupy “cake” theme, PancakeSwap is a major force on the DeFi scene, thanks to the sheer size of the Binance blockchain. It easily slots into the top three most active DEX platforms, with daily volumes exceeding $2.6 billion.

The platform is user-friendly, with detailed community guides, troubleshooting articles, and customer support. In addition, you can trade in over 30 major cryptos backed by an equal number of high-quality liquidity pools.


SushiSwap

Is based directly on Uniswap, with a fork in the original code created by its anonymous developer who goes by the pseudonym Chef Nomi.

Right from the outset, SushiSwap has courted controversy. To generate liquidity, its founder encouraged users to deposit in Uniswap tokens, leeching away almost $810 million from Uniswap in a “vampire attack.”

Chef Nomi then proceeded to withdraw his liquidity from the project, generating a massive controversy. Ultimately, he backtracked and returned all funds, relinquishing his control over the project to a new team.

Since these early missteps, SushiSwap has maintained healthy growth rates in the crowded arena of Ethereum-based DEX/AMM platforms. It currently ranks in the top ten list, with daily volumes of close to $800 million across 400+ markets.


dYdX

dYdX is a major DEX platform with a heavy focus on reducing the inflated gas prices on Ethereum. It is one of the few platforms to offer gasless deposits to new users who deposit above a certain threshold. The platform has plans to make this a permanent feature.

dYdX is also working closely with StarkWare to deploy a Layer 2 scalability engine designed to reduce gas costs and trading fees further. Using Ethereum Smart Contracts, dYdX enables traders to invest in the crypto-equivalent of futures trading and other derivatives.

Due to its unique position on the Ethereum ecosystem, dYdX has managed to gain ground on other more popular DEX platforms like Uniswap. As a result, at the end of 2021, dYdX is ranked second on the list of the most active DEX platforms, with daily volumes of $5.4 billion.


Raydium

Instead of Ethereum or Binance, the Raydium platform operates on the highly promising Solana blockchain. As a result, the Ethereum-competitor has a vibrant developer ecosystem, and its cryptocurrency has grown at least 16,000% since January 2021.

The increased interest in the Solana blockchain has also helped Raydium, an AMM platform based on the Serum DEX.

The platform gives access to over 430 trading pairs, with Solana-USDT being the most popular.

The native token, also called Raydium, is the foundation of all future apps and projects on the Solana and Serum ecosystems.

The project’s primary focus is to function as the engine of DeFi on Solana. However, with current daily volumes already reaching $300 million, Raydium shows a lot of promise for future growth.


TraderJoe

Launched in 2020 as a less expensive, more efficient alternative to Ethereum,  Avalanche blockchain focuses on decentralized apps.

Its AVAX token has hit all-time high demands in late 2021, thanks to positive media coverage and high-profile partnerships with entities like Deloitte.

This surge has also propelled TraderJoe, the major DEX platform based around Avalanche blockchain, to the top of the DEX pile in recent times. Its pole position in the blockchain ecosystem has helped drive TraderJoe’s daily trades close to $1 billion.

You can trade major cryptos, stake and gain the native JOE token as rewards, lend other cryptos and farm yields on the TraderJoe platform. With low fees and over 170 markets, TraderJoe is a top target for anyone interested in the Avalanche ecosystem.


Top Pick: Uniswap

The Top pick is Uniswap, for its deep liquidity pools, its user-friendliness, and its commitment to continuous innovation.

As the various DeFi ecosystems continue to grow and expand, the importance of DEX aggregators and AMM platforms will increase further.

These platforms serve a vital purpose, finding liquidity and facilitating transactional activity across multiple blockchains.

To say that the future of DeFi, and by extension, the future of finance as we know it, hinges on DEX aggregators would not be an overstatement.


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Kudos to @ChessurKot

I 💚 it so much i had to share it !!!

Amazing poster and imagination !!!

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Bitcoin Taproot

On November 14th, block height 709,632, Bitcoin’s Taproot upgrade was activated. The update brings with it improvements to the flexibility, security, and efficiency of bitcoin transactions. And as Bitcoin’s first protocol upgrade in over four years, it’s a major milestone in the development of the network. 

Below, we outline the Taproot upgrade, what it changes, and how it will impact the bitcoin network going forward.

Three interconnected upgrades, deployed simultaneously

The Taproot upgrade is actually an umbrella term referring to three interconnected Bitcoin Improvement Proposals (BIPs) set to activate simultaneously: 

  1. BIP 340, or Schnorr. This proposal introduces Schnorr signatures, a digital signature scheme that is faster, more secure, and less data-intensive than the cryptographic method currently in use (Elliptic Curve Digital Signature Algorithm, or ECDSA).
  2. BIP 341, or Taproot. This proposal defines Pay-to-Taproot (P2TR), a new way to send bitcoin that enhances privacy and flexibility for users. It also implements Merklized Alternative Script Trees (MAST), which compress complex Bitcoin transactions into a single hash. This reduces transaction fees, minimizes memory usage, and improves Bitcoin’s scalability.
  3. BIP 342, or Tapscript. This proposal defines Tapscript, an update to Bitcoin’s original scripting language that enables P2TR transactions, leverages Schnorr signatures’ improved efficiency, and allows for more flexible upgrades going forward.

Taproot adoption timeline

On June 12th, 2021, these upgrade proposals reached a 90% consensus among miners, thus locking in their November activation as a soft fork to Bitcoin’s protocol. As a soft fork, the Taproot upgrade is backwards compatible with older versions of bitcoin and does not create a separate, parallel blockchain, as was the case with Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash. 

Adoption of taproot is expected to grow slowly over a period of years, just as it did with SegWit, the last major Bitcoin upgrade. Two years after SegWit’s activation, roughly 50 percent of transactions used it; today, four years after, that proportion is 80 percent. The main reason for this slow rate of adoption is that cryptocurrency wallets and service providers choose to opt-in on their own schedule.

Taproot’s impact

The Taproot upgrade will improve Bitcoin in a number of ways, such as:

  • Lower fees: Since the data size of complex transactions will be reduced, transaction fees will decline proportionally.
  • Improved lightning network efficiency: Taproot will make transactions on the Lightning Network cheaper, more flexible and more private.
  • Enhanced smart contract functionality: With Taproot, Bitcoin will be able to host smart contracts with any number of signatories while retaining the data size of a single-signature transaction. This lays the technical foundation for DeFi on the Bitcoin network.
  • And many others

In other words, the Taproot upgrade is a massive improvement to the Bitcoin protocol.

Lightning network improvements and expanded smart contract capabilities will improve bitcoin’s utility; meanwhile, lower transaction fees and increased network speed will improve its scalability. 

For this reason, we’re thrilled to welcome BIP 340, 341, and 342 at block height 709,632 and beyond.

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AltCoin Stores

ALT Coin Stores and Services List

This page is to promote actual stores and people who sell services for ALTcoins.

What is most important, is to spread the word and make people aware of the widespread adoption of the cryptocurrencies all around the globe and in all layers of life !!!

*Not Updated… Work in Progress...

Stores selling goods NexWave – http://www.nexwave.ca

Coin payments processed Coaex – Buy custom gold bars, gold bullion, silver and jewelry – http://www.coaex.com/ – BTC, LTC, DOGE, BC, NOBL, FTC   

CoinCable Mining Supplies    – https://coincable.com    – BTC, LTC, PPC, NVC, XPM, YAC, PayPal

Crypto Coin Wallet Cards    – http://www.cryptocoinwalletcards.com    – LTC

Register domain using Bitcoin and Litecoin    – http://www.lovingdomains.com    – BTC, LTC, NMC, PPC, NVC

Pay hosting with Bitcoin and Litecoin    – http://www.lovinghosting.com    – BTC, LTC, NMC, PPC,

NVC Amazonia Imports    – http://btcpipeshop.com    – 42, ANC, BTC, BC, BQC, CAT, CGB, DGC, DMD, DOGE, DVC, FRC, FRK, FST, FTC, GLD, LTC, MAX, MZC, MEC, NET, NMC, NVC, NXT, PPC, QRK, RED, SBC, SPT, STR, SXC, TRC, UNO, WDC, XPM, & ZET

WROL.INFO – Survival Supplies    – http://wrol.info    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, NVC, TRC, XPM, KGC, RED, ORB, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, QRK, ZET

NewsBam Usenet Services    – http://www.newsbam.com    – BTC, LTC, STR, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, ORB, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC,

SXC Cryptobooks – Buy eBooks with with cryptocurrency    – http://www.cryptobooks.com    – BTC, LTC, FTC, PPC, DVC, SXC

Bitezze – Buy precious metals with cryptocurrency    – http://bitezze.com    – BTC, LTC, STR, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, SXC, ADT, MEC, ANC, ZET, NET, PayPal Passthru

CryptoDirect    – http://www.cryptodirect.cf    – BTC, LTC, FTC, PPC, NVC, WDC, XPM, IFC, DGC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRC

Cheap Miners – Cheap ASIC miners and accessories    – http://www.cheapminers.com    – BTC, LTC, XPM

Dahms Weinversand – German Wine Home Delivery    – http://www.dahms-weinversand.de   

4:19 Store    – http://www.419store.com    Crypto Game Keys    – http://www.cryptogamekeys.com    – BTC, LTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, ORB, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, SXC, ADT, MEC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK, COL, SBC

VPS City    – http://www.vps-city.com    – LTC, PayPal Passthru

Thermostats, actuators and controllers    – http://www.thermostatenshop.nl    – BTC

Electric heating appliances    – http://www.budgetheat.eu    – BTC

Romer and 2HEAT far infrared panels    – http://www.infraroodpanelen.eu    – BTC

Outdoor- and ramp heating    – http://www.opritverwarmingen.eu    – BTC

Ceramic heating elements    – http://www.keraheat.com    – BTC Distinguished

Imports    – https://distinguishedimports.com    – BTC, LTC, PPC

GameCardVN    – http://gamecardsvn.com   

Verbena Products – Family owned online store specializing in bringing our customers high end Health and Beauty products at very competitive prices.    – https://www.verbenaproducts.com    – BTC, LTC, PPC

Cryptocoin Stuff!    – http://www.cryptocoinstuff.com    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, ORB, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, SXC, ADT, MEC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK, COL, SBC, FRC

Retro Towers    – http://www.retrotowers.co.uk    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, ORB, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, ADT, MEC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK, COL, SBC, FRC

VPS4ME    – http://vps4.me    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, SXC, ADT, MEC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK

HostClub    – http://hostclub.me

WaterIdo – Healthy Water Revitalizer    – http://waterido.com    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, ADT, MEC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK, COL   

Sarasota Slot Machines    – http://sarasotaslotmachines.com    – BTC, LTC, IFC, MEC, PayPal Passthru

GRKreations Direct    – http://grkreationsdirect.com    – BTC, LTC, FTC, NMC, PPC, NVC, WDC, TRC, XPM, IFC, KGC, RED, BQC, CGB, DVC, CAP, DGC, GLD, YAC, SXC, ADT, MEC, ANC, QRK, ZET, NET, FRK, COL, SBC, FRC, PayPal Passthru

Mining Hardware    – http://www.mininghardware.co.uk    – BTC, LTC

DuinoBits – Arduino kits (UK & Europe)    http://www.duinobits.com    – BTC, LTC

Johnsbay Flooring Co. – Flooring Material including Carpeting, Wood flooring, Laminate, Tiles.    – http://www.johnsbay.com    – BTC

Hash Rate Store    – https://www.hashratestore.com    – BTC, LTC

Coin Gas – Steam game codes for alt coins    – http://www.coingas.com    – BTC, CAP, DGC, FTC, GIL, LTC, NVC, PPC, WDC, CGB

sauce4coins    – http://sauce4coins.com    – BQC, BTC, LTC, BTB, CGB, FTC, CAP, VNC, DGC, XPM (and others if you email them)

BottleCaps Store – Itunes cards and World of tanks tokens    – http://bottlecapstore.weebly.com    – CAP’s and LTC – Canadian Orders for Itunes only

cryptosextoys    – http://www.cryptosextoys.com    – BTC, CAP, DGC, FTC, LTC, NVC, PPC, CGB, SXC

dailybit – Daily special something new everyday – http://dailybit.net    – BTC, LTC, XPM, FTC,CAP, IFC, WDC, NVC, NMC, TRC, KGC, PPC, RED, STR, WDC, Peercoins and Paypal

REDCOINSHOP – Herbal pills remedies    – http://REDCOINSHOP.com    – RED

pythonpills- Male enhancement pill    – http://pythonpills.com/red    – RED

bitcoinprbuzz – Press Release services for crypto projects – Copy Writing and content creation – Business consulting    – http://bitcoinprbuzz.com    – BTC, DVC,BTC, CGB, LTC and FST

finite by design – Coins, Pendants etc    – http://www.finitebydesign.com    – CGB

cryptothrift – Online Thrift Shop    – https://cryptothrift.com    – BTC, LTC

Litehosting- Web Hosting    – http://Litehosting.org    – BTC, LTC, NMC, XPM

ltcasics – All kinds of gift cards    – http://ltcasics.com    – LTC AltcoinTIP    – http://reddit.com/r/ALTcointip    – BTC, LTC, PPC, NMC, FTC, and XPM

DirectVoltage – alternative energy retailer    – http://DirectVoltage.com    – BTC, LTC, FTC, PPC

Sex Stories    – http://erotica4sxc.tk/about-2    – SXC

Porn Database    – http://www.porndatabase.co.uk    – SXC

3D Porn    – http://www.lynortis.com/alt-coins.php    – SXC

coinaxis    – https://coinaxis.com/    – LTC

dvc4giftcards – Giftcards    – http://dvc4giftcards.us    – DEV

Bitcora – Bitcoin templates and themes – https://bitorca.com   

Epawnatl- Pawn Shop    – http://Epawnatl.com    – FRK, BTC

Etsyshop    – http://www.etsy.com/shop/InnovoDesign    – DOGE, IFC, COL,LTC

Open Source Solutions    – http://www.iquidus.co.nz    – BTC, MEC, LTC, Earthcoins

LEALANA PHYSICAL LITECOINS…and BITCOINS – http://www.lealana.com – LTC

Evonym – http://evonym.us/ -BTC, LTC, TRC, PPC.

Minecraft Server – https://alt-co.in/minecraft/ – GME

Sexslam – http://sexslam.com – RED

All Things Luxury – http://www.allthingsluxury.biz/ – BTC, LTC

7 Pay In – Pay for mobile and ISP services/ecash/WoT/Steam/whatever – https://7pay.in/ – BTC, LTC, CL and NVC

CryptFolio – CryptFolio lets you keep track of your cryptocurrencies – http://CryptFolio.com – BTC, LTC

Bananalizard.com – Video game store – http://bananalizard.com – BTC, LTC, CGB, XPM, paypal

Tagbond.com – Merchant site hosting – http://tagbond.com – BTC, TAG

Cleverpuffin – Web Hosting – http://www.cleverpuffin.com – LTC

Bitroad – Electronics from China including tablet, phones, surveillance, security and gadgets delivered worldwide in 3-6 days (express). – http://bitroad.co.uk/ – BTC, LTC

Get More Customers – San Francisco Marketing/SEO Company – http://get-more-customers.com and http://sanfranciscoseoagency.com/cryptocurrency/ – EAC

BitCoinPINS!! – http://www.bitcoinpins.com/ – EAC

Polish SEO company – http://dodawanie.com/ – EAC

FlightSchool! Commercial pilot and flying instructor – http://www.paul-bradley.com – EAC ribbit.me – http://ribbit.me https://coinpayments.net/

Tagbond.com https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=317408

This is a list of services and games that support LottoCoin (LOT): Services:

CyberSticker service: http://www.cryptostickers.com/

Reload Creative (app/web development service): http://reloadcreative.com.au/

Advertising pixels http://www.qugetser.com/lot-map

SEO Service http://sanfranciscoseoagency.com/cryptocurrency/

Games: CoinBomb: http://coinbomb.biz/lottocoin/

Lotto Game: http://lottocoin.org/lottogame/

Another Lotto Game: http://www.keezi.com/lotto/index.php

Lotto Dice Game: http://www.lottodice.tk/

Here is a list of shops/services/games that accept EarthCoin Iquidus Technology –

Open Source Solutions – 

http://www.iquidus.co.nz/

Get More Customers – San Francisco Marketing/SEO Company – http://get-more-customers.com

http://sanfranciscoseoagency.com/cryptocurrency/

BitCoinPINS!! http://www.bitcoinpins.com/

Polish SEO company http://dodawanie.com/

FlightSchool! Commercial pilot and flying instructor http://www.paul-bradley.com

Beautiful EarthCoin Paper Wallet Generator http://earthaddress.org/

EarthCoin Gaia Game http://gaia.l8.lv/

Logo Design http://logodynamic.blogspot.ca/p/sold-logos.html

Dice Game http://earthdice.tk/

LixNez Games http://www.lixnez.com/eacgames.html

EarthRoll Game http://earthroll.l8.lv/

Kissmyweb.com – We Build Websites – Simple! http://www.kissmyweb.com BTC and DVC accepted

http://scryptstore.com Gold & Silver – Paypal direct deposits and gift cards

Healthiverse – http://healthiverse.net

TuffWraps – Athletic Wrist Wraps   – http://tuffwraps.com

Crypto Alley – The Online Digital Currency Marketplace – http://www.cryptoalley.com

Cryptmint – Precious Metal Bitcoin Wallets & Physical Coins – http://www.cryptmint.com/

Devcoin Store – http://devcoinstore.com

Crypto Store – http://cryptostore.io

Armonie Sonore – http://www.armoniesonore.com

StickerzLab – http://www.stickerzlab.com   

Trade4Bitcoin – Comics and Collectibles   http://www.trade4bitcoin.com

Scryptcoin Store – http://www.scryptstore.com 

Fine Art Source – http://out-of-court-settlement.com

NitroBacku – http://www.nitrobackup.com

Cardz4Cash – Gift, Prepaid, Game, and VoIP Cards + more – http://cardz4cash.com

Vapeur Canada – http://www.vapeurcanada.com

DOGMA Portraits – http://dogmaportraits.com

Heat4Feet – http://www.heat4feet.net

BitcoinMetals – http://www.bitcoinmetals.us

DDoS Cover – http://ddoscover.com

Doge Host – http://dogehost.co.uk

Bit Electronics – http://bitelectronics.net/

http://quickbomb.com   RED https://dicenow.com

PXL COIN – http://www.pxlcoin.com/

Here is a list of sites that accept QRK:

http://www.petscoin.com/ – Animal/Pet store, Donations to Shelters

http://www.51attack.com/ – T-Shirt makers that currently accept 31 cryptocurrencies

http://www.chasinho.org/shop/ – Tea shop in Berlin

http://www.keepitwooden.com – Custom Wooden Shot Glasses (Accepts Coinpayments)

http://www.appsforcoins.com/?currency=QRK – Apple iOS Apps

143VPN – http://143vpn.com

SimRai Game Servers – http://www.simrai.com

CryptoHosted.com – http://cryptohosted.com

The Staking Machine – TSM – http://www.thestakingmachine.com

Vox – http://www.vox-game.com/buy-with-crypto-coins/

Upchurch Design – http://upchur.ch

BTC Headshop – http://btcheadshop.com

Bitcoin Sportscards – http://bitcoinsportscards.com

ThanksBitcoin.com – http://www.thanksbitcoin.com

Those shops/services accept payment using Graincoin (GRA), many of which through CoinPayments that support Graincoin:

Wood Shot Glass http://woodshotglass.com/

Tuff Wraps http://tuffwraps.com/

Computer hardware and consumer electronics   http://brownboxtech.net

WaterIdo – Healthy Water Revitalizer http://waterido.com

Xbox Gold 48 Hour Codes – 2 for $1 http://xbox48.bugs3.com

Iquidus Technology – OpenSource Software, Hi-Performance Hardware http://www.iquidus.co.nz/

Retro Towers – Gaming Hardware http://www.retrotowers.co.uk/

Stickerz Lab – French Sticker Decorations http://stickerzlab.com/

Pixcoin – Stickers for Crypto Coins http://pixcoin.com/

Crypto GameKeys – Buy CD Keys, PSN cards, PS3/4/Vita games http://www.cryptogamekeys.com ThanksBitcoin – a Bitcoin shop http://www.thanksbitcoin.com

Advertise Service http://cryptotiler.com/

Graincoin main thread at: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=361503.0

143VPN – http://143vpn.com

SimRai Game Servers – http://www.simrai.com

CryptoHosted.com – http://cryptohosted.com

The Staking Machine – TSM – http://www.thestakingmachine.com

Vox – http://www.vox-game.com/buy-with-crypto-coins/

Upchurch Design – http://upchur.ch

BTC Headshop – http://btcheadshop.com

Bitcoin Sportscards – http://bitcoinsportscards.com

ThanksBitcoin.com – http://www.thanksbitcoin.com

Wood Shot Glass : http://woodshotglass.com/

Tuff Wraps http://tuffwraps.com/

Computer hardware and consumer electronics   http://brownboxtech.net

WaterIdo – Healthy Water Revitalizer http://waterido.com

Xbox Gold 48 Hour Codes – 2 for $1 http://xbox48.bugs3.com

Iquidus Technology – OpenSource Software, Hi-Performance Hardware http://www.iquidus.co.nz/

Retro Towers – Gaming Hardware http://www.retrotowers.co.uk/

Stickerz Lab – French Sticker Decorations http://stickerzlab.com/

Pixcoin – Stickers for Crypto Coins http://pixcoin.com/

Crypto GameKeys – Buy CD Keys, PSN cards, PS3/4/Vita games http://www.cryptogamekeys.com ThanksBitcoin – a Bitcoin shop http://www.thanksbitcoin.com

Advertise Service http://cryptotiler.com/

Gamble with Altcoins http://www.coincasino.cc – Casino that takes many coins

http://www.litecointogox.com – Bet on LTC when it comes to GOX or coinbase – BTC, LTC, FTC,IFC ,KGC, NMC, NVC, WDC, XPM, STR, RED, TRC, Peercoin

http://cryptoblackjack.kicks-ass.net – BlackJack style game – GME, DBL, MNC, LKY, WDC, DGC, BQC, PXC, PPC, GLD, MEM, DMD, EZC, FRK, CAP, IFC, KGC, CSC, CGB, HBN

http://alt-co.in/slots.php – A Slot machine – FTC, WDC, DGC, CHN, LTC, BBQ, GMC

http://REDCOINCASINO.com – Various unique gambling games – RED

http://redcoinlotto.com – Lotto – RED

http://coinjack.com/ – BlackJack – RED

http://lotto.coinworld.us/ – Multiple coin lotteries – DGC, FLC, RED, MEC, EMD, ALF, CAP, CGB, IFC, ARG, LTC, CRC

http://litecoinkamikaze.com – LTC

http://fckamikaze.com – FTC

http://minikaze.com – MNC

http://bit-loot.com – LTC

http://www.litecoinlottery.com/ – LTC

http://rapidballs.eu   – 5 Minute Lotto site – WDC, XPM, TIX, DVC

http://litecoinkamikaze.com – LTC

http://fckamikaze.com – FTC

http://minikaze.com – MNC

Provably fair Litecoin Roulette – http://www.l8.lv/ – Single Zero European Style Litecoin Roulette.

Provably Fair! DogeCoin Provably fair DogeCoin Roulette – http://dogespin.l8.lv/

Single Zero European Style Dogecoin Roulette. Provably Fair! BlackJack style game http://cryptoblackjack.kicks-ass.net/

A Slot machine http://alt-co.in/slots.php

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Bitcoin (BTC) :

1P1tTNFGRZabK65RhqQxVmcMDHQeRX9dJJ


LiteCoin(LTC) :

LYAdiSpsTJ36EWCJ5HF9EGy9iWGCwoLhed


Ethereum(ETH) :

0x602e8Ca3984943cef57850BBD58b5D0A6677D856


EthereumClassic(ETC) :

0x602e8Ca3984943cef57850BBD58b5D0A6677D856


Cardano(ADA) :

addr1q88c5cccnrqy6xesszzvf7rd4tcz87klt0m0h6uvltywqe8txwmsrrqdnpq27594tyn9vz59zv0n8367lvyc2atvrzvqlvdm9d


BinanceCoin(BNB) :

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BitcoinCash (BCH)

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Bitcoin SV (BSV)

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ZCash(ZEC) :

t1fSSQX4gEhove9ngcvFafQaMPq5dtNNsNF


Dash(DASH) :

XcWmbFw1VmxEPxvF9CWdjzKXwPyDTrbMwj


Shiba(SHIB) :

0x602e8Ca3984943cef57850BBD58b5D0A6677D856


Tron(TRX) :

TCsJJkqt9xk1QZWQ8HqZHnqexR15TEowk8


Stellar(XLM) :

GBL4UKPHP2SXZ6Y3PRF3VRI5TLBL6XFUABZCZC7S7KWNSBKCIBGQ2Y54





Bitcoin Halving

Bitcoin Halving

What Is a Bitcoin Halving?

Bitcoin’s most recent halving occurred on May 11, 2020. To explain what a Bitcoin halving is, we must first explain a bit about how the Bitcoin network operates.

Bitcoin’s underlying technology, blockchain, basically consists of a collection of computers (or nodes) that run Bitcoin’s software and contain a partial or complete history of transactions occurring on its network.

Each full node, or a node containing the entire history of transactions on Bitcoin, is responsible for approving or rejecting a transaction in Bitcoin’s network.

To do that, the node conducts a series of checks to ensure that the transaction is valid. These include ensuring that the transaction contains the correct validation parameters, such as nonces, and does not exceed the required length.

A transaction occurs only after all the parties operating in Bitcoin’s network approve it within the block on which the transaction exists. After approval, the transaction is appended to the existing blockchain and broadcast to other nodes.

The blockchain serves as a pseudonymous record of transactions (i.e., its contents are visible to everyone, but it is difficult to identify transacting parties in the network). This is because the blockchain assigns encrypted addresses to each transacting party in the network. That said, even those who do not participate in the network as a node or miner can view these transactions taking place live by looking at block explorers.

More computers (or nodes) added to the blockchain increase its stability and security.

There are currently 12,035 nodes estimated to be running Bitcoin’s code. Though anyone can participate in Bitcoin’s network as a node, as long as they have enough storage to download the entire blockchain and its history of transactions, not all of them are miners.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • A Bitcoin halving event is when the reward for mining bitcoin transactions is cut in half.
  • This event also cuts in half Bitcoin’s inflation rate and the rate at which new bitcoins enter circulation.
  • Both previous halvings have correlated with intense boom and bust cycles that have ended with higher prices than prior to the event.
  • Bitcoin last halved on May 11, 2020, around 3 p.m. EST, resulting in a block reward of 6.25 BTC.

Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin mining is the process by which people use their computers to participate in Bitcoin’s blockchain network as a transaction processor and validator.

Bitcoin uses a system called proof of work (PoW). This means that miners must prove they have put forth effort in processing transactions to be rewarded. This effort includes the time and energy it takes to run the computer hardware and solve complex equations.

Faster computers with certain types of hardware yield larger block rewards and some companies have designed computer chips specifically built for mining. These computers are tasked with processing Bitcoin transactions, and they are rewarded for doing so.

The term mining is not used in a literal sense but as a reference to the way precious metals are gathered.

Bitcoin miners solve mathematical problems and confirm the legitimacy of a transaction. They then add these transactions to a block and create chains of these blocks of transactions, forming the blockchain.

When a block is filled up with transactions, the miners that processed and confirmed the transactions within the block are rewarded with bitcoins.

Transactions of greater monetary value require more confirmations to ensure security. This process is called mining because the work performed to get new bitcoins out of the code is the digital equivalent to the physical work done to pull gold out of the Earth.

El Salvador made Bitcoin legal tender on June 9, 2021. It is the first country to do so. The cryptocurrency can be used for any transaction where the business can accept it. The U.S. dollar continues to be El Salvador’s primary currency.

Bitcoin Halving

After every 210,000 blocks mined, or roughly every four years, the block reward given to Bitcoin miners for processing transactions is cut in half.

This cuts in half the rate at which new bitcoins are released into circulation. This is Bitcoin’s way of using a synthetic form of inflation that halves every four years until all bitcoins are released into circulation.

This system will continue until around the year 2140.

At that point, miners will be rewarded with fees for processing transactions, which network users will pay. These fees ensure that miners still have the incentive to mine and keep the network going. The idea is that competition for these fees will cause them to remain low after the halvings are finished.

The halving is significant because it marks another drop in the rate of new Bitcoins being produced as it approaches its finite supply: the total maximum supply of bitcoins is 21 million. As of October 2021, there are about 18.85 million bitcoins already in circulation, leaving just around 2.15 million left to be released via mining rewards.

In 2009, the reward for each block in the chain mined was 50 bitcoins. After the first halving, it was 25, and then 12.5, and then it became 6.25 bitcoins per block as of May 11, 2020.

To put this in another context, imagine if the amount of gold mined out of the Earth was cut in half every four years. If gold’s value is based on its scarcity, then a “halving” of gold output every four years would theoretically drive its price higher.

Coin Metrics Bitcoin Halving
Coin Metrics logarithmic chart of Bitcoin price action following halvings.

Halving Implications

These halvings reduce the rate at which new coins are created and thus lower the available amount of new supply, even as demand might increase.

This can cause some implications for investors as other assets with low or finite supply, like gold, can have high demand and push prices higher.

In the past, these Bitcoin halvings have correlated with massive surges in Bitcoin’s price.

The first halving, which occurred on Nov. 28, 2012, saw an increase from $12 to $1,217 on Nov. 28, 2013.

The second Bitcoin halving occurred on July 9, 2016. The price at that halving was $647, and by Dec. 17, 2017, a bitcoin’s price had soared to $19,800. The price then fell over the course of a year from this peak down to $3,276 on Dec. 17, 2018, a price 506% higher than its pre-halving price.

The most recent halving occurred on May 11, 2020. On that date, a bitcoin’s price was $8,787. On April 14, 2021, a bitcoin’s price soared to $64,507 (an astonishing 634% increase from its pre-halving price). A month later, on May 11, 2021, a bitcoin’s price was $54,276, representing a 517% increase that seems more consistent with the behavior of the 2016 halving.

On May 12, 2021, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, announced that Tesla would no longer accept Bitcoin as payment, resulting in further price fluctuations.

In the week that followed Musk’s statements, the price of a bitcoin plunged below $40,000 after Chinese regulators announced restrictions banning financial institutions and payment companies from providing cryptocurrency-related services.

Though these two announcements may have temporarily created a price drop in Bitcoin, there is the potential that the price fluctuations are more related to the halving behavior we have observed previously.

The theory of the halving and the chain reaction that it sets off works something like this:

The reward is halved → half the inflation → lower available supply → higher demand → higher price → miners incentive still remains, regardless of smaller rewards, as the value of Bitcoin is increased in the process

In the event that a halving does not increase demand and price, then miners would have no incentive. The reward for completing transactions would be smaller, and the value of Bitcoin would not be high enough.

To prevent this, Bitcoin has a process to change the difficulty it takes to get mining rewards, or in other words, the difficulty of mining a transaction.

In the event that the reward has been halved, and the value of Bitcoin has not increased, the difficulty of mining would be reduced to keep miners incentivized.

This means that the quantity of bitcoins released as a reward is still smaller, but the difficulty of processing a transaction is reduced.

This process has proved successful twice. So far, the result of these halvings has been a ballooning in price followed by a large drop.

The crashes that have followed these gains, however, have still maintained prices higher than before these halving events.

For example, as mentioned above, the 2017 to 2018 bubble saw the value of a bitcoin rise to around $20,000, only to fall to around $3,200. This is a massive drop, but a bitcoin’s price before the halving was around $650.3

Though this system has worked so far, the halving is typically surrounded by immense speculation, hype, and volatility, and how the market will react to these events in the future is unpredictable.

The third halving occurred not only during a global pandemic, but also in an environment of heightened regulatory speculation, increased institutional interest in digital assets, and celebrity hype. Given these additional factors, where Bitcoin’s price will ultimately settle in the aftermath remains unclear.

What Happens When Bitcoin Halves?

The term “halving” as it relates to Bitcoin has to do with how many Bitcoin tokens are found in a newly created block.

Back in 2009, when Bitcoin launched, each block contained 50 BTC, but this amount was set to be reduced by 50% roughly every four years.

Today, there have been three halving events, and a block now only contains 6.25 BTC.

When the next halving occurs, a block will only contain 3.125 BTC.

When Have the Halvings Occurred?

The first bitcoin halving occurred on Nov. 28, 2012, after a total of 10,500,000 BTC had been mined. The next occurred on July 9, 2016, and the latest was on May 11, 2020. The next is expected to occur in early 2024.

Why Are the Halvings Occurring Less Than Every Four Years?

The Bitcoin mining algorithm is set with a target of finding new blocks once every 10 minutes.

However, if more miners join the network and add more hashing power, the time to find blocks will decrease.

This is remedied by resetting the mining difficulty (or how hard it is for a computer to solve the mining algorithm) once every two weeks or so to restore a 10-minute target.

As the Bitcoin network has grown exponentially over the past decade, the average time to find a block has consistently remained below 10 minutes (roughly 9.5 minutes).

Does Halving Have Any Effect on the Bitcoin Price?

The price of Bitcoin has risen steadily and significantly from its launch in 2009, when it traded for mere pennies or dollars, to April 2021 when the price of one bitcoin traded for over $63,000.3

Because halving the block reward effectively doubles the cost to miners, who are essentially the producers of bitcoins, it should have a positive impact on price because producers will need to adjust their selling price to their costs.

Empirical evidence does show that Bitcoin prices tend to rise in anticipation of a halvening, often several months prior to the actual event.

What Happens When There Are No More Bitcoins Left in a Block?

Around the year 2140, the last of the 21 million bitcoins ever to be mined will have been mined.

At this point, the halving schedule will cease because there will be no more new bitcoins to be found.

Miners, however, will still be incentivized to continue validating and confirming new transactions on the blockchain because the value of transaction fees paid to miners is expected to rise into the future, the reasons being that a greater transaction volume that has fees will be attached, plus bitcoins will have a greater nominal market value.

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Block Reward

What Is a Block Reward?

Bitcoin block rewards are new bitcoins awarded to cryptocurrency miners for being the first to solve a complex math problem and creating a new block of verified bitcoin transactions.

The miners use networks of computers to do this, and every time a new block is created it is verified by all the other competing miners. Then a new math problem is introduced and the miners start over.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

A block reward refers to the number of bitcoins you get if you successfully mine a block of the currency.

The amount of the reward halves after the creation of every 210,000 blocks, or roughly every four years.

The amount is expected to hit zero around 2140.

Understanding Block Rewards

The block reward provides an incentive for bitcoin miners to process transactions made with the cryptocurrency. Creating an immutable record of these transactions is vital for bitcoin to work as intended.

The blockchain is like a decentralized bank ledger—one that can’t be altered after being created. The miners are needed to verify the transactions and keep this ledger up to date. Block rewards, and to a lesser extent, transaction fees, are their payment for doing so.

Bitcoin was designed so that new bitcoins are created at a consistent pace. So the difficulty of the math problem is adjusted every two weeks to ensure a steady output of new bitcoins—roughly one block of transactions every 10 minutes.

Bitcoin’s Block Rewards Vs. Ethereum’s

Ethereum, bitcoin’s main competitor as a cryptocurrency, also relies on block rewards to provide incentives to miners. With Ethereum, the reward is a digital token called “ether,” which is rewarded each time a miner succeeds in providing the mathematical proof of a new block. As with bitcoin, miners are also awarded a transaction fee, known as a “gas” fee.

Unlike with bitcoin, there is no limit on the number of Ethereum ether tokens that can be created, and they are created at a much faster pace—in seconds, versus about 10 minutes. So the total number of blocks in the Ethereum chain is larger than in the bitcoin chain.

The Future of Bitcoin Block Rewards

To limit inflation, bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto designed bitcoin to ultimately have only 21 million bitcoins.

This is why the size of bitcoin block rewards is halved after the creation of every 210,000 blocks, which takes around four years.

At bitcoin’s inception in 2009, each block reward was worth 50 BTC.

In May 2020, the block reward was halved a third time to 6.25 BTC.

And as of May 2021, there were already 18.7 million bitcoins in existence, or nearly 90% of the total planned supply.

Ultimately, the block reward is scheduled to reach zero around May 2140, but mining will likely no longer be profitable long before that date is reached.

As of April 2039, about 99.6% of bitcoins will already have been issued, and the block reward will be just 0.19531250 bitcoin.

Along the way, transaction fees are expected to become the primary incentive for bitcoin miners

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Calculate Hashes/s

How can I calculate how many hashes I generate per second?

I have a function which generates hashes from a string:

string GenerateHash(string plainText);

I generate as many hashes as possible with 4 threads.

How do I calculate how many hashes (or megahashes) I generate per second?

Your problem breaks down nicely into 3 separate tasks

  1. Sharing a single count variable across threads
  2. Benchmarking thread completion time
  3. Calculating hashes per/second

Sharing a single count variable across threads

public static class GlobalCounter
{ public static int Value { get;
private set;
} public static void Increment()
{ Value =GetNextValue(Value);
} private static int GetNextValue(int curValue) { returnInterlocked.Increment(ref curValue);
} public static void Reset() { Value = 0; } }

Before you spin off the threads call GlobalCounter.Reset and then in each thread (after each successful hash) you would call GlobalCounter.Increment – using Interlocked.X performs atomic operations of Value in a thread-safe manner, it’s also much faster than lock.

Benchmarking thread completion time

var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew(); Parallel.ForEach(someCollection, someValue => 
{ // generate hash GlobalCounter.Increment();
}); sw.Stop();

Parallel.ForEach will block until all threads have finished

Calculating hashes per second

... sw.Stop(); var hashesPerSecond = GlobalCounter.Value / sw.Elapsed.Seconds;

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BitcoinSV(BSV)
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ZCash(ZEC)
t1fSSQX4gEhove9ngcvFafQaMPq5dtNNsNF

Dash(DASH)
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Shiba(SHIB)
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