BitAddress

Open Source JavaScript Client-Side Bitcoin Wallet Generator

A Bitcoin wallet is as simple as a single pairing of a Bitcoin address with its corresponding Bitcoin private key. Such a wallet has been generated for you in your web browser and is displayed above.

To safeguard this wallet you must print or otherwise record the Bitcoin address and private key. It is important to make a backup copy of the private key and store it in a safe location. This site does not have knowledge of your private key. If you are familiar with PGP you can download this all-in-one HTML page and check that you have an authentic version from the author of this site by matching the SHA256 hash of this HTML with the SHA256 hash available in the signed version history document linked on the footer of this site. If you leave/refresh the site or press the “Generate New Address” button then a new private key will be generated and the previously displayed private key will not be retrievable. Your Bitcoin private key should be kept a secret. Whomever you share the private key with has access to spend all the bitcoins associated with that address. If you print your wallet then store it in a zip lock bag to keep it safe from water. Treat a paper wallet like cash.

Add funds to this wallet by instructing others to send bitcoins to your Bitcoin address.

Check your balance by going to blockchain.info or blockexplorer.com and entering your Bitcoin address.

Spend your bitcoins by going to blockchain.info and sweep the full balance of your private key into your account at their website. You can also spend your funds by downloading one of the popular bitcoin p2p clients and importing your private key to the p2p client wallet. Keep in mind when you import your single key to a bitcoin p2p client and spend funds your key will be bundled with other private keys in the p2p client wallet. When you perform a transaction your change will be sent to another bitcoin address within the p2p client wallet. You must then backup the p2p client wallet and keep it safe as your remaining bitcoins will be stored there. Satoshi advised that one should never delete a wallet.

Source:

https://www.bitaddress.org/

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Profitability Guide

Mining Profitability Guide

To calculate mining profitability, you should follow these steps, no matter which calculator you are using:

🔸️Be sure you know your GPU models and the Hash rates.

🔸️Be sure you know the algorithm of the coin.

🔸️Choose the exchange you plan to use for selling coins. This is necessary if you want more precise results.

🔸️Be sure you know your electricity cost.


You can find a list of calculators online that are used by miners, here:

https://bithouseco.home.blog/2021/09/12/mining-calculators/


🔹️ Be sure to keep track of what’s happening in the cryptocurrency world, if you aren’t doing so already. If a coin has problems, it will definitely affect the price and mining profitability, and may even prevent you from selling mined coins.

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Bitcoin is independent from “crypto”

Bitcoin vs “Crypto

@bithouseco

   The quality of Bitcoin’s monetary policy and the public’s confidence that the policy will be respected in the long-run is all what really matters.

For all of you out there, who believe that Bitcoin falls under the “crypto” umbrella, you could not be further from the truth.

“Crypto” is designated for the affinity scams that launched in Bitcoin’s shadow and attempted to leverage its pedigree and latch on to its narrative to sell useless tokens to unwitting noobs.

The scammers believe they can “beat” Bitcoin by providing a feature set and a “culture” more appealing to the masses and make individuals more likely to pick their favorite “crypto” over the best money humans have ever come in contact with.

As most people, these people couldn’t be more delusional.

The success of Bitcoin doesn’t depend on the “culture” of bitcoiners.

Bitcoin is a protocol that has no way of knowing the “culture” of its users.

If it is successful it will be used by many different people from many worldwide  lands with very different cultures.

A cultural hold on a particular competitive landscape of social media doesn’t really impress no one at the end of the day.

What really matters is the quality of Bitcoin’s monetary policy and the public’s confidence that the policy will be respected in the long-run.

The best way to build confidence in that policy is to make the cost of attempting to change that policy, or falling out of line with the consensus rules of the network as high as possible.

Nothing in “crypto” comes close to Bitcoin in these regards, and that is because the Bitcoin network is slowly but surely integrating itself into the energy sector of the globe.

The execution risks associated with mining Bitcoin have become very high.

If a miner fucks up and falls out of consensus, they are punished materially by missing out on precious block reward payouts.

As the network becomes more integrated with the energy sector, these costs will rise and abiding by the monetary policy put forth by the network of full nodes will be paramount.

It happend in 2017 when the biggest corporate players and miners attempted to hard fork a block space increase that fell out of consensus with the full nodes on the network.

The unwillingness to follow consensus ruined reputations and lost a lot of miners a lot of money over the four years that have followed the hard fork.

This is the certainty for the people, that bitcoin is a suitable monetary good in the digital age.

All of “crypto” pretenters focused on speed, app building, and being less “energy intensive” have completely missed the plot and have relegated themselves to a hedonistic odd sand box filled with degenerate gamblers and low energy thinkers.

Bitcoin has already won because it has won the energy game.

This energy game is what will protect Bitcoin’s monetary policy in the long-run, being strongly incentivized by full nodes to do so.

Very few understand this and very few will ever understand that !!!

Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a decentralized digital currency that enables instant payments to anyone, anywhere in the world. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority: transaction management and money issuance are carried out collectively by the network.

The original Bitcoin software by Satoshi Nakamoto was released under the MIT license. Most client software, derived or “from scratch”, also use open source licensing.

Transactions are verified by network nodes through cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain.

The cryptocurrency was invented in 2008 by an unknown person or group of people using the name Satoshi Nakamoto.

The currency began use in 2009 when its implementation was released as open-source software.

Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies, products, and services, but the real-world value of the coins is extremely volatile.

Bitcoin is the first successful implementation of a distributed crypto-currency, described in part in 1998 by Wei Dai on the cypherpunks mailing list. Building upon the notion that money is any object, or any sort of record, accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a given country or socio-economic context, Bitcoin is designed around the idea of using cryptography to control the creation and transfer of money, rather than relying on central authorities.

Bitcoins have all the desirable properties of a money-like good. They are portable, durable, divisible, recognizable, fungible, scarce and difficult to counterfeit.

Bitcoin has been criticized for its use in illegal transactions, the large amount of electricity (and thus carbon footprint) used by mining, 
price volatility, and thefts from exchanges.

Some economists and commentators have characterized it as a speculative bubble at various times.

Bitcoin has also been used as an investment, although several regulatory agencies have issued investor alerts about bitcoin.

Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimated that in 2017, there were 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin.

Why?

Bitcoin is P2P electronic cash that is valuable over legacy systems because of the monetary autonomy it brings to its users.

Bitcoin seeks to address the root problem with conventional currency: all the trust that’s required to make it work — Not that justified trust is a bad thing, but trust makes systems brittle, opaque, and costly to operate.

Trust failures result in systemic collapses, trust curation creates inequality and monopoly lock-in, and naturally arising trust choke-points can be abused to deny access to due process.

Through the use of cryptographic proof, decentralized networks and open source software Bitcoin minimizes and replaces these trust costs.

Bitcoin Transactions are:

  • Permissionless and borderless. The software can be installed by anybody worldwide.
  • Anonymous. Bitcoin does not require any ID to use making it suitable for the unbanked, the privacy-conscious, computers or people in areas with underdeveloped financial infrastructure.
  • Private. When used with care bitcoin can support strong financial privacy.
  • Censorship-resistant. Nobody is able to block or freeze a transaction of any amount.
  • Fast. Transactions can be made almost as fast as data can travel over the Internet.
  • Cheap. Fees can be very very low.Irreversible once settled, like cash. (but consumer protection is still possible.)
  • Online and available 24 hours a day, 365 days per year.

Bitcoin can also be a store of value, some have said it is a “swiss bank account in your pocket”.

Stored Bitcoins:

  • Cannot be printed or debased. Only 21 million bitcoins will ever exist.
  • Have no storage costs. They take up no physical space regardless of amount.
  • Are easy to protect and hide. Can be stored on a phone, computer, encrypted on a paper backup or memorized in your head.
  • No counterparty risk. If you keep the private key of a bitcoin secret and the transaction has enough confirmations, then nobody can take them from you no matter for what reason, no matter how good the excuse, no matter what.
  • Can be under divided possession with Multisignature. For example with a 2-of-3 multisig scheme there would be three private keys, of which any two is enough to spend the money. Those three keys can be spread anywhere, perhaps in multiple locations or known by multiple people. No other asset does this, for example you cannot hold gold coins under multisig.

What is Bitcoin?

A. Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer currency. Peer-to-peer means that no central authority issues new money or tracks transactions. These tasks are managed collectively by the network.

How does Bitcoin work?

A. Bitcoin uses public-key cryptography, peer-to-peer networking, and proof-of-work to process and verify payments. Bitcoins are sent (or signed over) from one address to another with each user potentially having many, many addresses. Each payment transaction is broadcast to the network and included in the blockchain so that the included bitcoins cannot be spent twice. After an hour or two, each transaction is locked in time by the massive amount of processing power that continues to extend the blockchain. Using these techniques, Bitcoin provides a fast and extremely reliable payment network that anyone can use.

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ASIC MANUFACTURERS

ASIC MINERS MANUFACTURERS 2021

🔹️ http://www.baikalminer.com/

🔹️ https://bitfury.com/

🔹️ https://bitmain.com/

🔹️ http://www.bolonminer.com/

🔹️ https://canaan.io/

🔹️ http://miner.ebang.com.cn/

🔹️ http://www.fusionsilicon.com/

🔹️ https://www.goldshell.com/

🔹️ https://ibelink.co/

🔹️ https://www.innosilicon.com/

🔹️ https://www.microbt.com/

🔹️ https://obelisk.tech/

🔹️ https://www.pandaminer.com/

🔹️ https://www.spondoolies-tech.com/

🔹️ https://strongu.com.cn/

🔹️ http://ipollo.com/

To be updated in the future!

🔹️🔹️🔹️

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Asic Miners Vendors List

ASIC MINERS VENDORS LIST – 2021

https://51asic.ru/ Russian

https://akminer.com/ Chinese

https://www.antminerdistribution.com/ – Holland

https://asicmarketplace.com/ – Hong Kong

https://asicminermarket.com/ – China

https://bitcoinmerch.com/ – USA

https://www.bitmart.co.za/ – Zanzibar

https://blokforge.com/ – USA

https://bt-miners.com/ – USA

https://casaminers.com/en – Italy

https://coinminer.com/ – USA

https://coinminingcentral.com/ – England

https://cryptosupply.de/ – Germany

https://cryptodrilling.com/

https://www.cryptouniverse.at/

https://www.eastshore.xyz/

https://itopshop.net/

https://www.cryptominerbros.com/

https://mineshop.eu/

https://miningwholesale.eu/

https://miningcave.com/

https://pangolinminer.com/

https://printcrypto.io/

https://mining.sesterce.com/

https://shop.unlimitedminer.com/en/home/

https://whatsminer.net/

Satoshi Nakamoto bitcoin quotes

The Times 03/Jan/2009
Wikileaks
Lost coins
Transaction fees
Anonymous vs. Pseudonymous
bitcoin’s convenience against credit cards
Scarce asset
Generate new bitcoin address
Not having bitcoin would be the net waste
Inflation vs. Deflation in bitcoin
Potential for a positive feedback loop
…gain a new territory of freedom…
E-currency based on cryptographic proof
Attractive to the libertarian viewpoint
Root problem with conventional currency

Bitcoin’s Shroud of Subtlety and Allure

A new banner of freedom

Bitcoin’s Shroud of Subtlety and Allure

Daniel Krawisz

June 29, 2014

Attacks on Bitcoin

A successful attack on Bitcoin means attacking Bitcoin’s value.

There might well be a bug that could be exploited to put the network out of commission temporarily, but would soon be fixed and then the network would be up and running shortly thereafter.

To destroy Bitcoin permanently means to end the profit opportunities available with it, and that means either a malicious hashing attack on the network that makes mining impossible or such a malevolent policy against Bitcoin trade that even the black market abandons it.

Both of these require spending resources in proportion to the profits that Bitcoin enables.

In this article, I will discuss three reasons why such an attack is unlikely to succeed: antifragility, subtlety, and attacker defection.

The interplay of these three defenses makes Bitcoin into a kind of wave that rewards those who ride it and drowns those who resist it.

The first of these, antifragility, is exemplified in the fact that malicious hashing is impossible up to a certain fraction of the network.

Below the point that selfish mining becomes possible1 additional hashes per second are almost certainly beneficial because they increase the security of the network.

Any potential attacker, therefore, must weigh in the possibility that he may end up benefiting the network instead of destroying it.

A similar risk accompanies a legal attack on Bitcoin. Bitcoin can adapt to half-hearted attacks. It would move deeper into the black market where it would become permanently strengthened.

Furthermore, a legal attack could be easily corrupted into one that brings as many bitcoins as possible to the government agents instead of one that destroys it (see below).

Bitcoin’s Subtlety

Bitcoin adoption happens one person at a time, and this is true for potential attackers as well as the rest of us.

It takes an entrepreneurial mindset to be able to imagine what Bitcoin could become, given how comparatively small it is now.

It takes time and meditation for people to take Bitcoin seriously because most of its value is in the future.

By the time this happens, Bitcoin has become much more expensive than when they first learned of it.

Thus, Bitcoin is protected from attackers by being initially beyond their understanding.

When Bitcoin was very small, it was very stealthy and was completely unknown to the establishment.

Now they laugh at it, just as it has begun to grow bold.

Of course, we don’t know who really dismisses it and who is deliberately trying to draw attention away from it.

Bitcoin’s Allure

Furthermore, potential attackers are at a disadvantage for another reason.

Bitcoin tends to oppose organizations rather than people.

Even someone who stands to lose from Bitcoin by not reacting to it, such as a banker or government agent, stands to gain a great deal by buying now.

Only the very wealthiest people might reasonably expect to be worse off attempting to buy up as much as possible now than if it were gone. (This could happen if their attempt to buy caused the price to rise too fast relative to their ability to acquire additional bitcoins, to the point that they ultimately had less influence over the future Bitcoin economy than they have over the economy of today.)

Thus, the agency problem with Bitcoin affects bitcoin competitors as well as Bitcoin holders.

Nearly any government agent who begins to see bitcoin as a potential threat must also simultaneously see it as an opportunity.

He, too, can invest in Bitcoin. And why shouldn’t he?

Bitcoin may be a threat to his livelihood, but it may well be making him an offer he can’t refuse.

How can an organization that stands to lose by the adoption of Bitcoin provide its members with a better opportunity for staying loyal than Bitcoin provides for defection?

Even those who might resist the temptation to defect would have to think about the defection of his fellows.

How quickly is adoption happening? Is there time to mount an attack before Bitcoin becomes too powerful? How easily could the resources for such an attack be amassed, given both the ignorance and treachery of the other agents.

If such an attack would be unlikely to succeed, then buying now would be the only intelligent action.

Regardless of whether he liked Bitcoin, it would be futile to continue pursuing a doomed cause.

Potential Bitcoin attackers are in a Prisoner’s Dilemma.

In the same way that the people cannot easily rebel against the king owing to a lack of coordination on their part, governments cannot rebel against Bitcoin for the same reason.

The government puts the people in a Prisoner’s Dilemma against one another, and Bitcoin does the same to government agents.

Bitcoin is like Invasion of the Body Snatchers.

Bitcoin attracts inside men to act as covert saboteurs. There have long been predictions from both bitcoiners and naysayers of impending government attacks, but I think there is a possibility that Bitcoin could win without suffering much resistance.

Moreover, although I said above only that any legal bitcoin attack could be perverted, the considerations discussed in this section tend to make such diffusion very likely.

Bitcoin defends itself by being obscure, but once it has attracted someone’s attention, its best interest is for that person to understand the logic presented here. For then he will also understand that his best course is to deny Bitcoin’s threat to his superiors and quietly to become its willing slave.


  1. Right now Bitcoin Core does not follow the proper strategy to protect against selfish mining even at very low hashing rates, but the fix would be extremely easy to implement and would make selfish mining impossible up to 25% of the hash rate. 

Source:

https://nakamotoinstitute.org/mempool/bitcoins-shroud-of-subtlety-and-allure/

What is Hashrate ?

Hashrate Bitcoin network h/s
Bitcoin Hash Rate

Hashrate (Hash per secondh/s) is an SI-derived unit representing the number of double SHA-256 computations performed in one second in the bitcoin network for cryptocurrency mining.

Hashrate is also called as hashing power. It is usually symbolized as h/s (with an appropriate SI prefix).

What is hashing power or hash rate?

The hash rate is the primary measure of a Bitcoin miner‘s performance.

In 2014, a miner’s performance was generally measured in Ghash/s, or billions of hashes per second.

The hash/second unit is also part of a common measure of a Bitcoin miner’s electric efficiency in the term watts /Ghash/s, denoted as W/Ghash/s. As 1 watt is equal to 1 joule/s, this measure can also be expressed as J/Ghash, or joules per 1 billion hashes.

Bitcoin network hash rate

Bitcoin network hashrate chart

The hash/s is also used in calculations of the Bitcoin network’s overall hash rate. Because each miner or mining pool only relays a solved block to the network, the overall hash rate of the network is calculated based on the time between blocks.

While not an accurate measure of network hash rate at any given instance in time, measurements over longer periods can be considered indicative and similar calculations are used in Bitcoin’s difficulty  adjustment.

In January 2015, the network hash rate was around 300 Phash/s, or 300 quadrillion hashes per second.

If you compare a bitcoin mining device to one that is designed to mine, for example, Ethereum, you will notice a very large apparent difference in hash rates.

This is because there are many different algorithms that cryptocurrencies use. They all require different amounts of memory and computing power in order to be mined.

To put it simply, bitcoin and its SHA256 algorithm is considered by today standards to be relatively easy to compute. As a result, a mining device that is still relevant today would need to produce hashes in the terahash range and up.

If we were to compare this to Ethereum, you’ll find that most modern Ethereum mining devices (typically GPU’s) operate in the megahash range.

At first glance, you may think that the bitcoin mining device is significantly more powerful or more productive.

While it’s true that it produces more hashes (of the SHA256 variety), this is because bitcoin hashes are easier to produce computationally.

As a consequence, the network difficulty is significantly higher for bitcoin.

To make things even more confusing, some cryptocurrencies intentionally chose algorithms that can only be mined using a basic CPU.

As a result, mining devices for this network that can produce hundreds of hashes per second are considered to be high and very competitive.

So what does all this mean?

Basically, it means that looking at the hash rate alone doesn’t necessarily tell you the effectiveness of the miner.

You also need to understand the network difficulty, and what the norm is for most mining devices for that particular cryptocurrency.

How can I calculate how many hashes I generate per second?

Your problem breaks down nicely into 3 separate tasks:

  • Sharing a single count variable across threads
  • Benchmarking thread completion time
  • Calculating hashes p/sec
  • Sharing a single count variable across threads

Now that we know that not all hashes are the same we need to know how to calculate the estimated profitability of a miner based on its hash rate.

For this, will need to use a mining profitability calculators, they are available in the Internet.

public static class GlobalCounter

{
public static int Value { get; private set; }
   public static void Increment()
{
Value = GetNextValue(Value);
}
   private static int GetNextValue(int curValue)
{
return Interlocked.Increment(ref curValue);
}
   public static void Reset()
{
Value = 0;
}
}

Before you spin off the threads call GlobalCounter.

Reset and then in each thread (after each successful hash) you would call GlobalCounter.

Increment – using Interlocked.X performs atomic operations of Value in a thread-safe manner, it’s also much faster than lock.

Benchmarking thread completion time

var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
Parallel.ForEach(someCollection, someValue =>
{
// generate hash
GlobalCounter.Increment();
});
sw.Stop();
Parallel.ForEach will block until all threads have finished

Calculating hashes per second

...
sw.Stop();
var hashesPerSecond = GlobalCounter.Value / sw.Elapsed.Seconds;

How is the hash rate measured?

Hash rate is a unit measured in hashes per second or h/s and here are some usual denominations used to refer it.

Hash rate denominations:

  • 1 kH/s is 1,000 (one thousand) hashes per second;
  • 1 MH/s is 1,000,000 (one million) hashes per second;
  • 1 GH/s is 1,000,000,000 (one billion) hashes per second;
  • 1 TH/s is 1,000,000,000,000 (one trillion) hashes per second;
  • 1 PH/s is 1,000,000,000,000,000 (one quadrillion) hashes per second;
  • 1 EH/s is 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (one quintillion) hashes per second.

Common Hash rate Conversions:

  • 1 MH/s = 1,000 kH/s;
  • 1 GH/s = 1,000 MH/s = 1,000,000 kH/s;
  • 1 TH/s = 1,000 GH/s = 1,000,000 MH/s = 1,000,000,000 kH/s.

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Hey ho,Hoist the Waffels

Hey ho, Hoist the Waffels

The TSMC and his men stoled the mighty chip out of it's bed,
And bound it on it's pcb plate.
The hasrate be ours, and by the hashrate powers,
It's where we'll roam.
Yo Ho...all you miners,
Hoist the waffels high.
Heave ho, traders and profets,
Never shall We die !
Some miners have perished and some are alive,
Others hold the hashrate high.
With the keys to their wallets...
And a pool's fee to pay,
We lay to Crypto's Creed !
Yo, ho hash together,
Hoist the waffels high.
Heave,ho traders and profets,
Never shall We die !
Yo, ho hash together,
Hoist the Waffels high.
The hashrate be ours,
Never shall we die !

Source of Inspiration :

“Hoist the Colours” by Hans Zimmer

$10 Million each coin 🤯😳🤯

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